Arlene Inouye

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Arlene Inouye


Arlene Inouye is the Secretary of United Teachers of Los Angeles. She was born and raised in Los Angeles and attended Clover Avenue Elementary, Webster Junior High, and University High School. Her grandparents emigrated from Japan to Boyle Heights, and her family was incarcerated during World War II. Three generations of her family have attended LAUSD schools.

She has a BA and MA in communicative disorders from Long Beach State University. She has been a Spanish bilingual speech and language specialist for 18 years in over 30 schools throughout the district. As Treasurer, Arlene led UTLA through the historic “Build the Future Fund the Fight” that addressed UTLA’s structural deficit to provide greater support for members and organizational sustainability. Through the years she has also been a community organizer, human rights activist, parent educator, multicultural and human relations specialist, and leader in progressive educational reform.

Her experience as a union and community activist includes:

Japan Visit

Arlene Inouye June 27, 2016 · Osaka, Japan

I am profoundly grateful for the opportunity and thank the Japanese union activists for taking care of every part of my visit including translators and various modes of transportation. Just as we discussed the foundation of one-on-one organizing, and the importance of relationships, I experienced deep international solidarity that we share as brothers and sisters across the Pacific. This is a critical juncture for the future of Japan.

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— with Sam Winslow, Tracy Lai, Minori Yoneyama, Eriko Kojima, Gregory Cendana, Kent Wong, Johanna Hester, Kim Geron, Monica Thammarath, Darren Shiroma, Susan Li, Minh Tran, Stan Kiino, Wade Kyle, Luisa Blue, Jessica Cendana, Steven Moy, Ray Takeda, Theresa Montano, Eric Heins, David Goldberg, Cesar Moreno, Mary Cathryn Ricker, Kristy Ishii, Kenji Kurazawa.

UTLA leadership

Arlene Inouye September 5, 2015

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Our unity and diversity makes us strong. — with Daniel Barnhart, Cecily Myart-Cruz, Alex Caputo-Pearl, Betty Forrester, Juan Ramirez and Colleen Schwab.

Here to stay rally

Rally and musical and art performances on Saturday, January 14, 2017, starting at 11 a.m. at 501 North Main St, 90012, LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes next to La Placita, Los Angeles.

Join us to stand up for the values of love, compassion and family as we begin a campaign of righteous resistance. We will join hands and stand together to oppose criminalization, mass deportations, and hate crimes. We are #HereToStay and we shall not be moved.

Speakers include: California State Controller Betty Yee; Assemblymember Jimmy Gomez; Miguel Santana, City Administrative Officer, City of Los Angeles; Angelica Salas, CHIRLA; Rusty Hicks, LAC Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, Laphonza Butler, SEIU; Arlene Inouye, UTLA; and Tom Steyer, Next Gen Climate.

Hosted by (partial list):

African Coalition, Black Immigrant Network (BIN), Bend the Arc, California Dream Network (CDN), Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA), Center for Community Change (CCC), Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), Human Rights Campaign, Korean Resource Center (KRC), Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, Mi Familia Vota National Immigration Law Center, NextGen California, SEIU California, SEIU 721, SEIU 2015, SEIU UHWW, SEIU USWW, UCLA Dream Center, UNITE HERE, UTLA[2]

Environment protest

Arlene Inouye December 13, 2015:

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With Rachel Bruhnke, Linda Teach and Kitty Kroger at Port of Los Angeles.

Yes on 15 Back to School Phonebank

Ryan Andrews August 28 2020·

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Join DSA-LA and YDSA🚨TOMORROW🚨for our Yes on 15 Back to School Phonebank ft. guest speakers Carlos Callejo, Cal Poly Pomona student and YDSA member, Wade Kyle, UTLA Political Action Committee of Educators (PACE) Chair, and Arlene Inouye, UTLA Secretary and Bargaining Co-Chair!

Ryan Andrews is with Yunyi and Nina Eliasoph, Arlene Inouye, Sarah Squirm, Noriko Nakada, Alberto Saavedra, Rocio Rivas, Jenny Chung, Phylis Hoffman, Erika Feresten, Michael Lumpkin, Jorge Castaeda, Elizabeth Untalan, Kristina Meshelski, Brian Dionisi, Pilar Schiavo, Haley Potiker, Anabel Nevarez Ruvalcaba, Ezra Pugh, Jason Boxer, Mark Masaoka, Douglas McBride, Tal Levy, Abigail Gutmann-Gonzalez, Aisha Stars, Hsingii Tseng Bird, Barry Eidlin, Keith Brower Brown, Ankur Patel, Jesus Hermosillo, Jenni Chang, Brenden Gallagher, Alex Kliner, Charlotte Ariel, Meagan Day, Fatima Iqbal-Zubair, Lucia Garcia, Michelle Antoinette Boley, Alejandro Pina, Vanessa Castro Scott, Anitra Wetzel, Jim Smith, Steve Seal, Fernando Ramirez, Nicky Martin, Michelle Ching, Bill Barclay, Jamie Penn, Xavier Santos, Brandon Rey Ramirez, Marc Bender, Casey Ramirez, Kat Nathalie, Annaly V. Medrano, Hannah Klein, Peter Mathews, Bill Barrett, Gabe Gabrielsky, Alan Minsky, Reggie Wong, Armin Mah, Cyn Huang, Janet Hurtado, Robert Mejia, Imani Beckett, Erika Alvarez, Juan Gutierrez, Angelica Duenas, Will Shattuc, Daniel Dominguez, Rosa Diaz, Henry Huerta, Mario Valenzuela, Josh Smith, Hannah Kessel, Diane Hirsch-garcia, Carlos Amador, Alex Wolinetz, Karla Aviles Griego, Ben Hauck, Alyssa Stonoha, Marlin Medrano, Melissa Arredondo, Marc Baca, Jordan Greenslade, Joel Greenfield, Kyle Gregory, Leslie Simon, Jasmine Ivy, Sean Broadbent, Cheng-Sim Lim, Hae Min Cho, Hai-ching Cheah, Marcy Winograd Maikiko James.

Latinos for Peace

On October 31 2009, Latinos For Peace issued a statement calling for “no escalation of the war in Afghanistan and for expedited withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as an end to the coup government in Honduras”.

More than 100 activists endorsed the call, including Arlene Inouye, Los Angeles, CA.[3]

Latino Congreso 2007

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Tom Hayden, Judith Le Blanc, Arlene Inouye, Maxine Waters, Lydia Lopez, Rosalio Urias Munoz.

Some 2,000 Latino leaders and activists from throughout the United States met in Los Angeles, at the Latino Congreso 2007, Oct. 5-9 to map an action plan and social justice program for the 2008 elections. Their goal was to bring out 10 million Latino voters who can play a decisive role in the presidential and congressional elections.

References

References