Mark Liu

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Mark Liu


Mark Liu is a Boston, Massachusetts activist. Programs and Operations Director Chinese Progressive Association (Boston).

Stanford

Mark Liu (A.B. 2005, Stanford University), active in Sweat Free Stanford.

Stanford South Africa panel

"Celebrating South African Freedom: A Symposium on the International Campaign to End Apartheid," organized by the Aurora Forum, January 2006. Along with Amanda Kemp, a founding member of the Stanford Students Out of South Africa and now a visiting professor of American studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Penn., other alumni panelists included lawyer Steven Phillips, a student activist and SOSA and Black Student Union leader at the time of the 1985 sit-ins, who now works as a political organizer, and Jory Steele, a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California in San Francisco. After her graduation from Stanford in 1993, Steele traveled to South Africa on a Fulbright scholarship and later worked for political organizations there.

Also taking part in Saturday's panel was South African activist and lawyer Albie Sachs, a longtime member of the African National Congress who lost an arm and the sight in one eye in 1988 in a car bomb attack by South African agents. Sachs, appointed in 1994 to the South African Constitutional Court by Nelson Mandela, was the author of a case decided in December that declared a constitutional right to same-sex marriage in South Africa.

The symposium also included the premiere of a segment of the film series Have You Heard from Johannesburg?, produced by Connie Field of Clarity Films. The segment documented the growth of the anti-apartheid movement in the United States in Washington, D.C., and on campuses, including Stanford, against the backdrop of violence in South Africa. After a projector failed in Kresge Auditorium during the last minutes of the 90-minute film, Field spoke with the audience about making and funding the film series, which is still in production.

'A tiny acorn grew into a huge tree'The campus movement in support of the Free South Africa campaign was the largest student movement in Stanford's history, involving hundreds of students over a period of years, panelists said. The international anti-apartheid movement is notable for the fact that it mobilized people in every major country in the world to act, said Clayborne Carson, director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute.

"I saw a tiny little acorn grow into a huge tree," said Sachs, who was arrested and imprisoned for his political activities in South Africa before going into exile in the 1960s. In exile, Sachs worked internationally to mobilize resistance to the South African government. In the early years, "the anti-apartheid movement was just another issue," he said. "But, eventually it became a clear moral question that caused all sorts of people to stand up and ask themselves, 'What does it mean to be a human being?'"

For Phillips, who after leaving Stanford served on the San Francisco Board of Education as the youngest person elected to office in that city, a visit to the Stanford campus by Bishop Desmond Tutu showed him the power of what he called "morality plus organization."

After the symposium, junior Mark Liu asked Kemp for her advice in strengthening current student organizing efforts. First, she would see about getting Liu an invitation to dinner with herself and other panelists, Kemp said. "Don't get discouraged," Kemp added. "Nurture yourself. Bring in people who can sustain you."[1]

Ear to the Ground Project

Ear to the Ground Project;

We would like to express our deep respect and appreciation for everyone who took the time to talk with us, and the organizations that generously hosted us during our travels. Interviews were confidential, but the following people have agreed to have their names listed for this publication:

Most of those listed were connected to Freedom Road Socialist Organization.

Mark Liu was among those on the list. [2]

Backing Marty Walsh, 2013

Right to the City VOTE is proud to join leaders from Boston’s communities of color, Oiste and Chinese Progressive Political Action to stand with Martin Walsh for Mayor.

A diverse group of civic leaders from communities of color have come together to unanimously endorse Marty Walsh in the race to become mayor of Boston.
We will be working to support the campaign in the upcoming weeks and we urge people in our communities to elect Marty Walsh as the next mayor of Boston!

Individuals (as of 10/12/2013)

Mukiya Baker-Gomez, Kelly Bates, Diana Bell, Doris Bunte, Karen Chen, Sean K. Daughtry , Paulo A. De Barros, Cindy Diggs, An Duong, Eric Esteves, Rev. Gregory Groover, Rev. James W. Hills, Gilbert Ho, Maude Huard , Samuel Hurtado, Robert Kinney, Baolian Kuang, Lauren Jacobs, Jenny Lau, Lisette Le, Will Lee, Mark Liu, Darlene Lombos, Tom Louie, Lydia Lowe, Julia Mejia, Gloribell Mota, Noemi Mimi Ramos, Tarso Ramos, Ivan Reyes , Danny Rivera, Talia Rivera, Daysa Santana, Khalida Smalls, Alejandra St. Guillen, Aaron Tanaka, Jian Hua Tang, Mario Teran, Natalicia Tracy, Veronica Turner-Biggs, Gladys Vega, Mariama White-Hammond, Ann Har-Yee Wong, Joseph Y. Wong, Charles Wynder, Jr., Henry Yee, Tony M. Yee.

Organizations:¿Oíste?, Chinese Progressive Political Action, Right to the City VOTE.[3]

The Chinatown Coalition

The Chinatown Coalition 2013 executive staff.

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(Left to right, front row): Current TCC executive staff: Sherry Dong, Janelle Chan, Elaine Ng. (Second row): Enoch Liao, Barbara Rubel, Vivien Wu, Mark Liu.

New Year celebration

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Chinese Progressive Association (Boston), December 28, 2015.

Celebrating the New Year with the Chinese Consulate! Suzanne Lee, and Mark Liu attended.

Now What? Defying Trump and the Left's Way Forward

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Now What? Defying Trump and the Left's Way Forward was a phone in webinar organized by Freedom Road Socialist Organization in the wake of the 2016 election.

Now what? We’re all asking ourselves that question in the wake of Trump’s victory. We’ve got urgent strategizing and work to do, together. Join Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson of the Movement for Black Lives and Freedom Road, Calvin Cheung-Miaw, Jodeen Olguin-Taylor of Mijente and WFP, Joe Schwartz of the Democratic Socialists of America, and Sendolo Diaminah of Freedom Road for a discussion of what happened, and what we should be doing to build mass defiance. And above all, how do we build the Left in this, which we know is the only solution to the crises we face?

This event will take place Tuesday November 15, 2016 at 9pm Eastern/8pm Central/6pm Pacific.

Those invited, on Facebook included Mark Liu.[4]

References