Ann Fagan Ginger

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Ann Fagan Ginger is listed as a sponsor[1] of the Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library in Oakland California.

She was married to James Wood.

WILPF honor

Neither power outages nor fires dimmed the respect and admiration that brought folks out October 27 2019 when WILPF East Bay and San Francisco held a reception honoring long term WILPF member Ann Fagan Ginger.

Ann, Executive Director Emerita of Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute, MCLI, sentinel for human rights in Berkeley, California has successfully argued a civil liberties case in the U.S. Supreme Court. She has provided expert testimony for several U.N. Human Rights Committees, taught courses on Peace Law and Human Rights at a number of law schools and is now in the final editing of her 23rd book: Our 100 Human Rights.

When Ann spoke at our afternoon program she pointed out that few of us, especially our youth and children, are aware of all of our human rights, particularly those found in International Treaties. Our 100 Human Rights makes U.N. treaties accessible and describes each of the rights in these documents: U.S. Constitution Amendments, Statutes passed by Congress, Court Opinions, Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the U.N. Charter.

Walter Riley, MCLI Board President, spoke of Ann's continued work for peace and justice law through MCLI's involvement in local issues of housing, homelessness, and sex workers.

President of the San Francisco Chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, NLG, and WILPF member, Judith Mirkinson acknowledged the relationship of international human rights and international law as the foundation of Ann's work and that women attorneys today stand on Ann's shoulders. NLG uses AFG's work to educate younger generations.

Past MCLI Board President, Steven Bingham talked of Ann's concept of using international law in American courts, of her remarkable tenacity and follow through as well as her books of history. He claimed: "Ann is a jewel in our midst!"[2]

CP

In 1945 Ann Fagan Ginger was a member of the Communist Party USA.

Conference on Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the 90s

The Conference on Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the 90s was the Committees of Correspondence's first national conference held in Berkeley, California July 17-19, 1992.[3]

Workshops that were held at the conference on Saturday, July 18 included:[4]

Strategy 2 Where to from here? What next in the struggle for democracy in the United States?

CoC

Ann Fagan Ginger has been a member of Committees of Correspondence.[[5]

Sacramento Marxist School

On Mar 19 2004 Ann Fagan Ginger lectured at the Sacramento Marxist School on How the Left Can Use the Law After 9-11.[6]

Letter to Obama

In March 2009 dozens of 'human rights groups' and activists in the United States, signed a statement urging President Barack Obama to rethink his decision to boycott the United Nations-sponsored anti-racism conference.

As you know, the Durban Review Conference is one of the most important international platforms for discussing the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerances. Given the brutal history of slavery and Jim Crow in the United States, your Administration has much to contribute to this discussion. A boycott would be inconsistent with your policy of engagement with the international community…

Individual signers of the statement included Ann Fagan Ginger of Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute.[7]

Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute

As of January 2013, board members of the Meiklejohn Civil Liberties Institute, were listed as:[8]

References

  1. http://www.marxistlibr.org/sponsors.html
  2. [1]
  3. Conference program
  4. Proceedings of the Committees of Correspondence Conference: Perspectives for Democracy and Socialism in the '90s booklet, printed by CoC in NY, Sept. 1992 (Price: $4)
  5. Dialogue & Initiative 2016, By CoC Ed Fund, page 4]
  6. http://www.marxistschool.org/default.aspx?page=allspeakers
  7. http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1074695.html
  8. Civil Liberties Institute, about us page, accessed Jan.10. 2012