Brigid Flaherty

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Brigid Flaherty is a North Carolina activist.

Pushback Network

As at April 12, 2010, the following served on the Pushback Network Staff:[1]

  • Peter Hardie, Executive Director, New York
  • Jason Cooper, Program Director, New York
  • Brigid Flaherty, Fundraising and Communications Coordinator, California

Supporting mental health workers

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Mental health workers rally at the office of Adminstrative Hearings in Raleigh Sept. 20 2010, when Judge Beecher Gray ruled five Black workers were fired unfairly. Pictured from right, UE150 members Cornell Hendrick (Central Regional Hospital), Ernestine Smythe (CRH), Dorothy Williams (CRH), Suzanne Bailey (CRH), Bernell Terry (CRH), Ben Carroll (UNC) and community supporters Brigid Flaherty (Pushback Network), Ajamu Dillahunt (North Caroline Justice Center) and Dani Martinez-Moore (North Caroline Justice Center).

"The 99% Spring"

Individuals and organizations supporting The 99% Spring, as of April 20, 2012, included Brigid Flaherty - Pushback Network .[2]

Marxist meme

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October 23, 2016 Jodeen Olguin-Tayler, Yong Jung Cho, Xochitl Oseguera, Latchmi Gopal, Heather McGhee, Nikki Fortunato Bas, Sarita Gupta, Alicia Garza, Laura Dawn, Agunda Okeyo, Greisa Martinez Rosas, Edith Sargon, Renata Pumarol, Ai-jen Poo, Trina Greene Brown, Naila Awan, Pramila Jayapal, Cindy Wiesner, Brigid Flaherty, Serena Perez and Angel Kyodo Williams, were part of a #GOPHandsOffMe meme.

Leaders

Down Home North Carolina leaders include;[3]

According to Brigid Flaherty.

Down Home North Carolina is a member-led grassroots organization. We believe in building power for working communities in small-town and rural North Carolina. We actually were formed right after the election. Todd Zimmer and I have been friends and organizers for many years. When we saw the results of the 2016 election, we felt really inspired to do something different and make big changes in our lives, because it felt like the political realities that we were facing required that of us.
We were looking at the political makeup of North Carolina and what had happened since 2010 and the far-right takeover of the state. Moving into 2016, we watched that happen at the federal level. It felt like the best offense that we were going to have was to make sure that we were building strong local leadership in places in North Carolina that weren’t necessarily the places that had a lot of infrastructure. For us, this felt like a long-term project that needed to happen in order to make sure that working people get what they deserve.
We said in November that we were going to start Down Home and then actually got off the ground in June this year. We have been around for about six months. Originally, it started out just Todd and me doing the organizing. I moved back to the mountains where my mother lives, and I was actually living with her for the first few months and Todd was organizing in Alamance in the central part of the state. We went door to door using a listening survey. We went with three broad questions: What are the issues that matter most to you and your family? Who or what is responsible for those issues? What are your solutions?[4]

Democracy Alliance

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Brigid Flaherty - Down Home North Carolina, and Whitney Kimball Coe - National Program Center for Rural Strategies, Monica Ramirez -Alianza de Campesinas National addressed the Spring 2018 Democracy Alliance gathering on "The role of rural women in a progressive future."

References