Redneck Revolt

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Redneck Revolt is an anti-capitalist organization that promotes class warfare.

Redneck Revolt is a "national network of community defense projects....[who are]...pro-worker, anti-racist organization that focuses on working class liberation from the oppressive systems which dominate our lives." The Redneck Revolt believes that they "must directly contribute to a struggle against all oppression, especially white supremacy."

According to their website:

"Our national network members come from a variety of ideological backgrounds - libertarians, humanists, anarchists, republicans, communists, and independents. In this project, political ideology is less important to us than our ability to agree on our organizing principles and work together."

[...]

"Our liberty is deeply rooted in the ability to not be coerced into making poverty wages while someone else amasses wealth on our backs and labor. Our communities, and not parasitic rich people, are entitled to all the wealth that we as workers produce."[1],[2]

Promoting Violence

The Daily Caller reported in July[3] that the “Resources” page[4] "...offers a number of publications that promote violence, including a 36-page manual called the 'Mini-Manual of the Urban Guerrilla,' which advises readers on how to conduct urban warfare, with sections on 'sabotage,' 'kidnapping,' 'executions,' and even 'terrorism.'"

Background

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The group has grown from a handful to about 40 branches across the U.S., including three in North Carolina, according to its website.

Community defense is one of the tactics Redneck Revolt uses to fight racism.

“It’s not about seizing the gun culture or becoming obsessed about guns,” said member Dwayne Dixon, 45, a UNC-Chapel Hill anthropology lecturer. “It’s only recognizing it’s useful to know how to field strip and clean a rifle as much as it is to know how to fix wiring in your house and use a circular saw.”

The group isn’t about threatening others, but about defending themselves in a charged environment in which they feel law enforcement hasn’t and won’t protect them, Dixon and others said.

The movement centers on building a self-sustaining community that recognizes working whites, blacks, and other people of color have more in common with each other than with the super-rich responsible for income stagnation and other economic harm on their daily lives, said Dixon of Durham.

Dixon was recently charged with two misdemeanors after be brought a semi-automatic rifle to downtown Durham on Aug. 18 amid rumors of a white supremest rally that never materialized. Dixon declined to comment on that incident at this time.

Redneck Revolt is also exploring how to address food shortages and health care challenges, Dixon said.

Still, not everyone thinks citizens arming themselves is the answer.

“I believe self-defense is the right of all citizens, but we cannot ignore the inherent danger that comes with untrained individuals operating as a self-appointed security force in our streets,” Sheriff Mike Andrews wrote in a statement. “This is why there has to be ground rules, an orderly process for demonstrations in our community before someone gets hurt. The climate in our country leaves us with no other choice than to face this issue head on.”

Armed members of Redneck Revolt provided security for counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia when white supremacists and nationalists marched against the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in a local park. They also provided security for counterprotesters at an anti-Sharia rally in Raleigh in June, and organized a counterprotest to a planned Ku Klux Klan cross-burning at a private farm in the Asheboro area in May.[5]


Phoenix John Brown Gun Club

History

Redneck Revolt is a spin off of the John Brown Gun Club, a community defense organization in Lawrence, Kansas, around 2004. It was part of a larger anarchist cooperative group known as Kansas Mutual Aid, according to a Redneck Revolt podcast.

The project went through a sort of hiatus, but around June 2016 reemerged as both the John Brown Gun Club and Redneck Revolt.

Eladio Bobadilla joined in the spring in response to what he described as hopelessness and and fear in the immigrant community.

Bobadilla, 31, a Mexican-born American and a Duke University doctoral student, said the group felt different because they were taking action.

“One of the main reasons I joined is (that) this group is directly confronting the terrors of the alt-right and is just a group of people who are willing and able to defend the most vulnerable,” he said. “And that really mattered to me.”[6]

Background

Community defense is one of the tactics Redneck Revolt uses to fight racism.

Phoenix Redneck Revolt

“It’s not about seizing the gun culture or becoming obsessed about guns,” said member Dwayne Dixon, 45, a UNC-Chapel Hill anthropology lecturer. “It’s only recognizing it’s useful to know how to field strip and clean a rifle as much as it is to know how to fix wiring in your house and use a circular saw.”

The group isn’t about threatening others, but about defending themselves in a charged environment in which they feel law enforcement hasn’t and won’t protect them, Dixon and others said.

The movement centers on building a self-sustaining community that recognizes working whites, blacks, and other people of color have more in common with each other than with the super-rich responsible for income stagnation and other economic harm on their daily lives, said Dixon of Durham.

Dixon was recently charged with two misdemeanors after be brought a semi-automatic rifle to downtown Durham on Aug. 18 amid rumors of a white supremest rally that never materialized. Dixon declined to comment on that incident at this time.

Redneck Revolt is also exploring how to address food shortages and health care challenges, Dixon said.

Still, not everyone thinks citizens arming themselves is the answer.

“I believe self-defense is the right of all citizens, but we cannot ignore the inherent danger that comes with untrained individuals operating as a self-appointed security force in our streets,” Sheriff Mike Andrews wrote in a statement. “This is why there has to be ground rules, an orderly process for demonstrations in our community before someone gets hurt. The climate in our country leaves us with no other choice than to face this issue head on.”

Armed members of Redneck Revolt provided security for counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia when white supremacists and nationalists marched against the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in a local park. They also provided security for counterprotesters at an anti-Sharia rally in Raleigh in June, and organized a counterprotest to a planned Ku Klux Klan cross-burning at a private farm in the Asheboro area in May.[7]

Mother Jones Profile

Redneck Revolt was featured along with other "Left-Wing Militants" BAMN, Bastards Motorcycle Club, and the Huey P. Newton Gun Club in an article at Mother Jones.

"This network, largely made up of anarchists and libertarians, is focused on anti-racist organizing among the white working class. Inspired by the Young Patriots—white Appalachian activists who allied with the Black Panthers in the late 1960s—the group now claims chapters in more than 30 regions. Redneck Revolt’s members can speak to their neighbors more easily than ivory-tower liberals, says Lucas Kelly, a member of the Phoenix chapter. Privilege' means one thing to them. It means a different thing to working-class folks who put in 60, 80 hours a week to support their family.' The group also runs firearms trainings. Last December, Kelly’s chapter sent members to a gun show, where they handed out posters tagged with the slogan 'Fighting Nazis Is an American Tradition: Stop the Alt-Right.'[8]

References