Candi CdeBaca

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Candi CdeBaca is a Denver Colorado activist. She is a (Nonpartisan) is a District 9 member-elect of the Denver City Council in Colorado. CdeBaca won the general runoff election on June 4, 2019, after advancing from the general election on May 7, 2019.

Communist

At a candidate forum April 7 Candi CdeBaca openly stated:

I don’t believe that our current economic system actually works. Capitalism, by design, is extractive, and in order to generate profit in a capitalist system, something has to be exploited…I believe in community ownership of land, labor, resources, and distribution of those resources. And so, whatever that morphs into, I think is what will serve community the best, and I’m excited to usher it in by any means necessary.[1]

Jacobin interview

You’re a DSA member. What was DSA’s involvement in your race?

Yes. I announced eighteen months before my election. Initially, I thought it was a mistake to have announced so early, but ultimately I think it was really smart to have done that, because I had a longer time to get on people’s radar. But it took us over a year to get a team assembled. It took until the January before my May election to even raise enough money to hire a campaign manager. And it was mostly a process of convincing people what I had spent four years convincing myself of, which was that we can actually win this.

DSA was one of the early adopters of my platform and my vision, and they were barely getting started here in Denver. We were kind of growing our organizations together. I had announced before AOC had announced her race, but having this parallel race on another side of the country inspire DSA to go harder and organize more quickly and effectively, I think that propelled people to pay attention to what DSA was doing, even as they were barely getting started here. The brand of DSA, from what was happening in New York, really translated here in Denver, even without the same level of organization, and it catalyzed other people to jump on our team.

I also had very deep relationships in the nonprofit community and the organizing community. And so people knew my work and were simply trying to find the funding to participate in a municipal election. Most of the organizations that endorsed and helped us do not typically participate in municipal elections.[2]

DSA endorsement

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Democratic Socialists of America - Denver June 5 2019.

We don't have a final count yet, but we feel comfortable reporting that DSA member Candi CdeBaca will be the new city councillor for District 9! This is an amazing night for democratic socialism and the broad left in Denver. Image may contain: 1 person, text

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Colorado Working Families June 4 at 10:51 PM · With her lead continuing to grow, we're ready to say: the incredible, inimitable community advocate Candi CdeBaca will be the next member of the Denver City Council from District 9.

Team Candi

City Councilwoman-elect Candi CdeBaca May 18 209·

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  1. TeamCandi is ready to #PaintTheCityPink! Join us—sign up here: https://form.jotform.com/90424782613154 — with Tyler McDermott, Vanessa Quintana, Candi CdeBaca, Meg DesCombes, Alexis Menocal Harrigan, Brea Zeise, Stephani Meyers and Kylie Dennis.

Dave Russell October 8, 2018

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Lisa Calderon hugging Olivia. — with Candi CdeBaca, Halisi Vinson and Kristin Mallory.

“Central 70” protest

February 2017 a raucous meeting hosted Thursday by the Colorado Department of Transportation and hijacked by angry residents of the Elyria-Swansea neighborhoods in central Denver, the presence of three members of the Legislature made a splash.

There was state Speaker of the House Crisanta Duran in the front row mostly watching and listening to the angry residents, who are all her District 5 constituents. And there standing at the back were reliably outspoken members of the House chamber Reps. Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, and Dan Pabon, D-Denver. They stood just watching, too, their lips sealed, their heads turning this way and that way as speakers made points and audience members shouted in response.

The lawmakers didn’t have to say anything. It was the fact that they came to the meeting that mattered to the protesters.

CDOT Director Shailen Bhatt hosted the event, intending to lay out next-step plans on the $1.2 billion “Central 70” interstate project, which is set to begin early next year.

“This is a state project, and they are the only ones who can help us now,” said protest organizer Candi CdeBaca, head of the Cross Community Coalition, whose family has lived in the neighborhood for generations. “If they will not represent us, we will elect others who will.”

“We’re here to listen tonight. We have to figure out how to bring people together,” said Duran, when she was asked to speak. “I think it’s a shame I-70 was placed where it was. I know you’re angry, and I’m sorry.”[3]

References