Service Employees International Union

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Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is the fastest-growing union in North America, with 2.1 million members across the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico working in three service industry "divisions." It was a member of the AFL-CIO until 2005, when the SEIU president removed the labor union from it.

Industry divisions

Health Care - The over 1 million members in the health care field include nurses, LPNs, doctors, lab technicians, nursing home workers, home care workers.

Public Services - The 850,000 members in this sector are local and state government workers, public school employees, bus drivers, and child care providers. SEIU is the second largest union of public service employees.

Property Services - The 225,000 workers who protect and clean commercial and residential office buildings. This includes 50,000 private security officers and public safety personnel.

Leadership

  • Mary Kay Henry, president[1]
  • Eliseo Medina, secretary-treasurer, former Executive Vice President, leading efforts in the South and Southwest. The Los Angeles Times called him, "one of the most successful labor organizers in the country."[2]
  • Mitch Ackerman, International Executive Vice President[3]
  • Kirk Adams, International Executive Vice President[4]
  • Gerry Hudson, Executive Vice President.[5]
  • Eileen Kirlin, International Executive Vice President[6]
  • Dave Regan, executive vice president (2008 - ) " a political and healthcare reform activist with almost 20 years of leadership experience in the labor movement."[7]
  • Tom Woodruff, Executive Vice President. He has overseen organizing for SEIU since 1996 and has served as a top-ranking officer since 2000.[8][9]
  • Andy Stern, president emeritus[10]

Former Leaders

  • John Sweeney, now AFL-CIO President Emeritus
  • Anna BurgerSecretary-Treasurer (2001 - 2010) and the first chair of Change to Win. The Wall Street Journal's 2007 Top 50 Women to Watch cited Burger and Fortune Magazine sited her as "the most powerful woman in the labor movement."[11]

Head office staff

SEIU head office staff, with salaries, 2006;[12]

Projects

Forming Change to Win

SEIU helped form Change to Win. Along with with four other Change to Win unions, the Teamsters for a Democratic Union, UNITE HERE, the United Food and Commercial Workers, and the Carpenters, SEIU disaffiliated from the AFL-CIO.

SEIU, the Laborers' International Union of North America (LiUNA)[13], and the United Farm Workers are now developing strategies and organizing campaigns together.[14]

Americans for Health Care

This SEIU project is an effort to unite working families, small business owners, seniors, health care workers, community leaders, and policy makers to make health care cost less for consumers. The group says it is using a grassroots push in states across the map including Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island and Washington for health care policies will increase access to quality, affordable health care. According to the website, more than 350,000 "Health Care Voters" made the group's pledge to make health care a priority.[14]

PurpleOcean.org

This online Internet-based union affiliate is a project to connect union grassroots efforts online. For example, thousands of members protesting Wal-Mart's business model used the site to take action against it. Now, PurpleOcean.org redirects back to SEIU, but the original PurpleOcean.org was its own website.[14]

Immigrant workers

SEIU is helping ensure immigrant workers have a shot at the American dream. Representing more immigrants than any other union, SEIU has been a leading voice for immigration reform that rewards work and improves conditions for all working people in this country. SEIU helped pave the way for organized labor to support legalization for hard-working, tax-paying immigrants, and the union's civic participation program encourages immigrants to actively participate in our communities and our democracy.[14]

America Coming Together

Amy Dean wrote in 2010 "A most dramatic example of the collapse of organizing efforts between electoral cycles is that of America Coming Together (ACT), an aggressive labor-based advocacy and get-out-the-vote operation led by Steve Rosenthal, former political director of the AFL-CIO, during the 2004 election cycle. With major financial supporters including George Soros, Peter Lewis and the Service Employees union (SEIU), ACT had 78 field offices spread throughout 12 swing states; it mobilized more than 50,000 people to canvass on Election Day. Yet despite an effort to keep the group intact after the elections, it folded completely within months. Its funders did not have a vision that extended beyond the drama of a big election year. “In an ideal world,” says Rosenthal today, “we’d have a progressive campaign that works year-round to create policy change and then gears up for election work. Unfortunately, right now, there is no permanent funding mechanism for progressive infrastructure, and without it, it’s very difficult to sustain operations.”[15]

Health care projects

SEIU covers 2.1 million members working in the health care field, including 110,000 nurses and 40,000 doctors. Its Nurse Alliance was a lobbying effort behind the first federal "safe staffing" legislation. The legislation worked to establish minimum nurse-to-patient ratios. They also lobbied for a bill that would limit mandatory overtime in hospitals.

The project partnered with providers like Kaiser Permanente and the League of Voluntary Hospitals in New York for their union lobbying and organizing efforts..

SEIU is the largest union of long-term care workers in the United States, covering 500,000 home care and 160,000 nursing home workers.

In April 2005, 41,000 home care workers in Michigan joined SEIU along with California, Oregon, Washington, Illinois New York and other members' locations.[14]

Janitorial workers

Over 5,000 janitors in Houston formed a union in late 2005 and then joined SEIU janitors in almost 30 other major cities. According to the SEIU website, the Houston janitors will soon begin negotiating a "master agreement."[14] see also Justice for Janitors

Security workers

SEIU has made the U.S. private security industry a project by partnering with unions abroad (such as Sweden-based Securitas AB), community allies, civil rights organizations, community groups and churches to lobby for "career growth for a largely African-American workforce." SEIU represents more than 50,000 officers who work in the public and private sector.[14]

Child care workers

In Illinois, 49,000 family child care providers joined SEIU and won a contract including training incentives, health benefits, and pay increases, they raised the bar for quality child care services across the country. SEIU represents more than 200,000 people who work in child care and early education.[14]

Wal-Mart workers

SEIU led public campaigns across the map in 2005 against corporate Wal-Mart, successfully. In New Hampshire and California, workers fought corporate retirement security changes and helped pass bill in Maryland to be sure profitable corporations (like Wal-Mart) pay "their fair share" of their employee's healthcare. SEIU members helped raise $11.8 billion for public services in 15 states. The group helped get a pair of ballot initiatives passed that raised California revenues to maintain emergency centers in Los Angeles and Alameda Counties.[14]

SEIU local bases have worked with the Wal-Mart Alliance for Reform Now.

Since Sliced Bread

Since Sliced Bread was a project with the SEIU, to which the Open Society Institute contributed a $100,000 grand in 2006 for a 15-month term.[16]

Official partnerships

On SEIU's website, they list the following global partners:

Connections to other organizations

According to Wade Rathke's blog, he is the founder and Chief Organizer of Community Organizations International[18] (formerly ACORN International[19]) and SEIU Local 100.

Through Rathke, as well as through other SEIU projects, the following are affiliated with SEIU:

Moratorium NOW!

On Sept. 17, 2008, the Moratorium NOW! Coalition to Stop Foreclosures and Evictions sponsored a rally at the Michigan State Capitol, demanding the State Legislature enact SB 1306, a two-year foreclosure moratorium bill. Represented at the rally was UNITE HERE, Change to Win, United Auto Workers, Service Employees International Union, American Federation of Teachers, Green Party of Michigan, Detroit Greens, the Cynthia McKinney presidential campaign, Students for a Democratic Society, National Lawyers Guild, Workers World Party, Food Not Bombs, Critical Moment, Michigan Emergency Committee Against War & Injustice, Michigan Welfare Rights, Call ’Em Out, Latinos Unidos of Michigan, Grand Rapids Latino Community Coalition, Joint Religious Organizing Network for Action and Hope, Adrian Dominican Sisters & Associates for Peace. The following led or spoke at the rally: Sandra Hines and Abayomi Azikiwe of the Moratorium NOW!; Kris Hamel; Reverend Ed Rowe, Central United Methodist Church; State Representatives Gabe Leland, Shanelle Jackson, Bettie Cook Scott and Steve Tobocman; State Sen. Martha G. Scott; Rubie Curl-Pinkins and her daughter Nikki Curl; Jerry Goldberg, people’s attorney and coalition leader; Juan Daniel Castro, Grand Rapids Latino Community Coalition; Linette Crosby; Larry Holmes, a leader of the Troops Out Now Coalition; Robert Pratt of UNITE HERE; and Rosendo Delgado of Latinos Unidos of Michigan.[27]

Moratorium NOW! is affiliated with the Bail Out the People Movement and is controlled by the Workers World Party. The organization's office is located at the Central United Methodist Church and holds meetings there.[28][29]

Supporting Democratic Socialists of America

DSA.jpg

Key SEIU leaders Mary Kay Henry, Eliseo Medina, Mitch Ackerman, Kirk Adams, Gerry Hudson, Eileen Kirlin, Dave Regan and Tom Woodruff placed and ad in Democratic Left Winter 2011/2012 edition praising Democratic Socialists of America. [30]

Finances

Cycle Total Democrats Republicans % to Dems % to Repubs Individuals PACs Soft (Indivs) Soft (Orgs)
2010 $305,950 $305,950 $-5,000 100% -2% $2,350 $303,600 $0 $0
2008 $2,687,853 $2,538,603 $136,000 94% 5% $167,303 $2,520,550 $0 $0
2006 $1,695,392 $1,555,994 $108,650 92% 6% $23,559 $1,671,833 $0 $0
2004 $2,299,912 $2,003,162 $291,750 87% 13% $72,662 $2,227,250 $0 $0
2002 $6,859,346 $6,608,724 $223,122 96% 3% $19,945 $1,976,662 $0 $4,862,739
2000 $6,380,110 $6,150,835 $212,650 96% 3% $13,565 $2,078,449 $400 $4,287,696
1998 $2,825,385 $2,739,260 $74,125 97% 3% $6,026 $1,704,984 $0 $1,114,375
1996 $1,707,552 $1,702,802 $3,750 100% 0% $18,282 $1,156,390 $0 $532,880
1994 $1,434,030 $1,412,030 $19,000 99% 1% $4,250 $1,057,694 $0 $372,086
1992 $1,080,356 $1,058,724 $8,750 98% 1% $3,150 $898,031 $0 $179,175
1990 $407,071 $396,721 $8,350 98% 2% $4,050 $403,021 N/A N/A
TOTAL $27,682,957 $26,472,805 $1,081,147 96% 4% $335,142 $15,998,464 $400 $11,348,951

The above information was gathered and presented by the Center for Responsive Politics OpenSecrets project.[31]

SEIU Affiliates

Affiliate Total Dems Repubs
1199SEIU $2,450 $1,950 $500
SEIU Communication Center $250 $250 $0
SEIU District 1199 Pennsylvania $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU District 1199 West Virginia $250 $250 $0
SEIU District 1199 WV/OH/KY $200 $200 $0
SEIU Health & Welfare Fund $500 $500 $0
SEIU Healthcare Minnesota $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania $250 $250 $0
SEIU Illinois State Council $500 $500 $0
SEIU Local 1 $1,550 $1,550 $0
SEIU Local 221 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 521 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 660 $450 $450 $0
SEIU Local 880 $500 $500 $0
SEIU Local 925 $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU Michigan Quality Home Care Campaign $600 $600 $0
SEIU Soula 2006 $2,050 $2,050 $0
SEIU State Council $300 $300 $0
SEIU United Healthcare Workers $3,350 $3,350 $0
SEIU United Healthcare Workers West $5,100 $5,100 $0
SEIU Local $700 $700 $0
SEIU Local 1 $5,825 $5,825 $0
SEIU Local 1000 $2,500 $2,500 $0
SEIU Local 1021 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 1107 $225 $225 $0
SEIU Local 113 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 1199 $5,352,749 $5,340,574 $5,250
SEIU Local 1199P $2,050 $2,050 $0
SEIU Local 16 $500 $500 $0
SEIU Local 1877 $340 $340 $0
SEIU Local 1999 $751,000 $750,500 $0
SEIU Local 200 $500 $500 $0
SEIU Local 200d $206 $206 $0
SEIU Local 2028 $400 $400 $0
SEIU Local 221 $500 $0 $500
SEIU Local 235 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 236 $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU Local 24369 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 250 $3,650 $3,650 $0
SEIU Local 300 $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU Local 32bj $750 $750 $0
SEIU Local 347 $1,700 $1,700 $0
SEIU Local 35 $200 $200 $0
SEIU Local 355 $2,000 $2,000 $0
SEIU Local 399 $790 $790 $0
SEIU Local 4 $200 $200 $0
SEIU Local 400 $200 $200 $0
SEIU Local 434B $5,048 $5,048 $0
SEIU Local 49 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 5000 $15,000 $15,000 $0
SEIU Local 503 $1,465 $1,465 $0
SEIU Local 508 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 517 $300 $300 $0
SEIU Local 521 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 531 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 535 $2,400 $2,400 $0
SEIU Local 585 $300 $300 $0
SEIU Local 615 $260 $260 $0
SEIU Local 617 $2,625 $2,375 $250
SEIU Local 660 $8,692 $8,692 $0
SEIU Local 668 $500 $500 $0
SEIU Local 715 $950 $750 $0
SEIU Local 721 $2,325 $2,325 $0
SEIU Local 73 $700 $700 $0
SEIU Local 74 $20,000 $20,000 $0
SEIU Local 760 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 775 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 790 $250 $250 $0
SEIU Local 80 $300 $300 $0
SEIU Local 880 $750 $750 $0
SEIU Local 99 $1,000 $1,000 $0
SEIU/Florida $350 $0 $350
SEIU/Illinois $3,250 $1,250 $2,000
SEIU/Nage $250 $250 $0
SEIU/New York $2,446 $2,446 $0
SEIU/West $2,100 $2,100 $0
SEIU/Pennsylvania $500 $500 $0
TOTAL $6,225,046 $6,208,571 $8,850
[32]

Top recipients of SEIU PAC funds

The following is a list of the top recipients of SEIU PAC funds, recorded in total contributions:[33]

Name Total Contributions
Steny Hoyer (D-Md) $74,550
Charles Rangel (D-NY) $74,000
Barack Obama (D-Ill) $73,818
Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) $73,000
David Obey (D-Wis) $72,000
Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif) $71,500
Nydia Velazquez (D-NY) $70,500
Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-Ill) $69,200
Louise Slaughter (D-NY) $68,000
Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY) $67,750
Sander Levin (D-Mich) $65,950
Henry Waxman (D-Calif) $64,500
Maxine Waters (D-Calif) $64,000
Richard Gephardt (D-Mo) $63,000
Donald Payne (D-NJ) $62,175
George Miller (D-Calif) $61,300
José Serrano (D-NY) $61,000
Lane Evans (D-Ill) $60,800
Maurice Hinchey (D-NY) $60,550
David Bonior (D-Mich) $60,400
Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) $60,000
Barbara Lee (D-Calif) $59,999
Martin Frost (D-Texas) $58,000
Patrick Kennedy (D-RI) $57,500
Ron Kind (D-Wis) $57,500
Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn) $56,250
Jane Harman (D-Calif) $55,000
Bob Filner (D-Calif) $54,950
Eliot Engel (D-NY) $54,500
Xavier Becerra (D-Calif) $54,000
Nita Lowey (D-NY) $54,000
Mark Udall (D-Colo) $53,550
Leonard Boswell (D-Iowa) $53,000
Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis) $52,500
Shelley Berkley (D-Nev) $52,000
Corrine Brown (D-Fla) $51,750
Jim Maloney (D-Conn) $51,500
Cynthia McKinney (D-Ga) $51,500
Steve Israel (D-NY) $50,750
Gary Ackerman (D-NY) $50,500
Stephanie Tubbs Jones (D-Ohio) $50,500
Kendrick Meek (D-Fla) $50,500
Bennie Thompson (D-Miss) $50,500
Major Owens (D-NY) $49,250
Lois Capps (D-Calif) $49,000
Robert Menendez (D-NJ) $48,750
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif) $48,650
Elijah Cummings (D-Md) $48,500
John Lewis (D-Ga) $48,500
Ted Strickland (D-Ohio) $48,500
Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill) $48,300
Barbara Boxer (D-Calif) $48,000
John Kerry (D-Mass) $47,047
Lynn Woolsey (D-Calif) $46,700
Pete Stark (D-Calif) $45,650
Joe Baca (D-Calif) $45,500
Jay Inslee (D-Wash) $45,500
Carolyn Kilpatrick (D-Mich) $45,500
Chris Cannon (R-Utah) $45,000
Darlene Hooley (D-Ore) $45,000
Anthony Weiner (D-NY) $44,750
James Clyburn (D-SC) $43,500
Jim Marshall (D-Ga) $43,000
Patty Murray (D-Wash) $43,000
Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich) $43,000
Brian Baird (D-Wash) $42,600
John Conyers, Jr. (D-Mich) $42,500
Bill Delahunt (D-Mass) $42,500
Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) $42,500
Nick Lampson (D-Texas) $42,500
Mike Ross (D-Ark) $42,500
John Dingell (D-Mich) $42,250
Howard Berman (D-Calif) $42,200
Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) $42,000
Mel Watt (D-NC) $41,700
Adam Smith (D-Wash) $41,100
Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill) $41,000
Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) $40,750
Gregory Meeks (D-NY) $40,750
Anna Eshoo (D-Calif) $40,350
Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) $40,000
Chaka Fattah (D-Pa) $39,500
Tom Allen (D-Maine) $39,000
Joseph Crowley (D-NY) $39,000
Alcee Hastings (D-Fla) $39,000
Baron Hill (D-Ind) $39,000
John Olver (D-Mass) $39,000
Earl Pomeroy (D-ND) $39,000
Ciro Rodriguez (D-Texas) $39,000
Michael McNulty (D-NY) $38,750
Dale Kildee (D-Mich) $38,500
Neil Abercrombie (D-Hawaii) $38,250
Mike Doyle (D-Pa) $38,000
Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif) $38,000
David Wu (D-Ore) $38,000
Mike Honda (D-Calif) $37,950
Danny Davis (D-Ill) $37,500
Brad Sherman (D-Calif) $37,200
Bobby Rush (D-Ill) $37,000
Carl Levin (D-Mich) $36,750

Top recipients of SEIU contributions

The following are the top recipients of funds from SEIU for the 2010 election cycle, as of November 8, 2009.[34]

Recipient Amount
Judy Chu $15,000
Scott Murphy $15,000
Michael Quigley $15,000
Kendrick Meek $10,250
Steve Israel $10,000
George Miller $10,000
Charles Rangel $10,000
Carolyn Maloney $9,500
Donna Edwards $7,500
Blanche Lincoln $7,500
Mark Schauer $7,500
Sara Feigenholtz $6,000
Kirsten Gillibrand $6,000
Harry Reid $5,350
Mike Arcuri $5,000
Timothy Bishop $5,000
Michael Capuano $5,000
Robin Carnahan $5,000
Christopher Carney $5,000
Tarryl Clark $5,000

The following are the top recipients of funds from SEIU for the 2008 election cycle, as of November 8, 2009.[35]

Recipient Amount
Barack Obama $74,578
Donald Cazayoux $22,500
Bill Foster $20,000
Al Franken $20,000
Donna Edwards $18,500
Laura Richardson $17,500
Mary Jo Kilroy $15,000
James Francis Martin $15,000
Harry Teague $15,000
Jay Rockefeller $12,300
Judith Feder $11,250
Joe Garcia $11,000
John Edwards $10,800
Eric Massa $10,750
Nancy Pelosi $10,650
George Miller $10,600
Jan Schakowsky $10,600
Ashwin Madia $10,500
Dina Titus $10,500
Mark Begich $10,250

Lobbying

SEIU lobbying expenditures are totaled at $1,404,772. Of that, $1,382,272 is specifically from the parent SEIU organization, $22,500 is from the subsidiary Local 32B-32J SEIU (which all went to Bill Lynch Associates), and $0 is from subsidiary 1199 (the SEIU Healthcare Education Project).[36]

Controversies


Obama's SEIU Thugs Attack a Black Conservative Outside Russ Carnahan Town Hall

External links

References

  1. Mary Kay Henry
  2. Eliseo Medina
  3. SEIU: bio on Mitch Ackerman (accessed on Nov. 21, 2011)
  4. SEIU: bio on Kirk Adams (accessed on Nov. 21, 2011)
  5. Gerry Hudson]
  6. SEIU: bio on Eileen Kirlin (accessed on Nov. 21, 2011)
  7. Dave Regan
  8. Tom Woodruff
  9. Leadership at SEIU
  10. Andy Stern
  11. Anna Burger
  12. http://www.bluemassgroup.com/diary/17003/at-least-my-union-
  13. LiUNA website
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 A closer look at SEIU
  15. Democratic Left • Winter 2010
  16. Wayback Machine of Since Sliced Bread
  17. SEIU global partnerships
  18. Community Organizations International website
  19. ACORN International, Inc.
  20. Site Fighters website
  21. Tides Foundation website
  22. Organizers' Forum website
  23. Social Policy website
  24. Wal-Mart Alliance for Reform Now website
  25. Wade Rathke's blog, organizations
  26. "Bus drivers threaten FirstGroup with strike," Independent, October 24, 2009
  27. International Action Center - Boston: People tell Michigan legislators: ‘MORATORIUM NOW!’ (accessed on Feb. 10, 2011)
  28. Pan-African News Wire File Photos on Flickr: Members of the Moratorium NOW! Coalition attending a meeting at the Central United Methodist Church on Nov. 20 in Detroit, Nov. 20, 2010 (accessed on Feb. 10, 2011)
  29. International Action Center - Boston: People tell Michigan legislators: ‘MORATORIUM NOW!’ (accessed on Feb. 10, 2011)
  30. Dem. Left, Winter 2011/2012
  31. SEIU on OpenSecrets
  32. Service Employees International Union Affiliates, OpenSecrets
  33. SEIU PAC fund recipients
  34. Service Employees International Union: Recipients for 2010 Cycle, OpenSecrets
  35. Service Employees International Union: Recipients for 2008 Cycle, OpenSecrets
  36. OpenSecrets, SEIU lobbying