Bonnie Lowenthal

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Bonnie Lowenthal


Bonnie Lowenthal is a Long Beach, California psychologist and politician. She was formerly married to Congressman Alan Lowenthal.

Career

Assemblymember Lowenthal received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Wisconsin (class of 1961) and a Master’s of Science in Community and Clinical Psychology from Cal State Long Beach (class of 1974). Since 1975, Lowenthal has been a licensed family counselor and mental health consultant. She has also served as a bilingual mental health consultant for the League of United Latin American Citizens, HeadStart, and the Centro de la Raza.[1]

'Psychology and human services in Cuba: Personal perspectives'

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In 1985 Alan S. Lowenthal, Carl Danson, Bonnie B. Lowenthal contributed an article "Psychology and human services in Cuba: Personal perspectives" to the Journal of Community Psychology Special Issue: Community Psychology in Cuba Volume 13, Issue 2, pages 105–116, April 1985.[2]

Article description

Through a series of meetings with Cuban social scientists, an analysis of the development and practices of psychology and related human services was attempted. Interviews were held at a medical school, at a local community health clinic, at a residential treatment facility and at one of the two universities in Cuba offering a degree program in psychology. The interviews revealed a network of interrelationships between: (a) work performance and a complex material and moral incentive system, where the workers played an active role in evaluating and modulating the system; (b) the health delivery system and its targeted community members, where services are adapted to the needs of the community; and (c) individuals and their neighborhoods, where local organizations are the mechanisms for community participation. It was concluded that a prime characteristic of Cuban society is to change the very nature of the relationships between people and their social institutions. Since community participation in social services is a growing concern within our own country, the Cuban system may provide reference points of note.

References

  1. [Assembly Member Bonnie Lowenthal of California]
  2. [1]