Difference between revisions of "Michael Wear"

From KeyWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Co-laborers)
 
Line 4: Line 4:
  
 
[[Michael Wear]] writes for [[The Atlantic]], [[Christianity Today]], [[USA Today]], [[Relevant Magazine]] and other publications on faith, politics and culture. Michael is a Senior Fellow at [[The Trinity Forum]], and he holds an honorary position at the University of Birmingham’s Cadbury Center for the Public Understanding of Religion. Michael Wear and his wife are both natives of [[Buffalo]], [[New York]]. They now reside in [[Northern Virginia]].<ref>[http://michaelwear.com/bio]</ref>
 
[[Michael Wear]] writes for [[The Atlantic]], [[Christianity Today]], [[USA Today]], [[Relevant Magazine]] and other publications on faith, politics and culture. Michael is a Senior Fellow at [[The Trinity Forum]], and he holds an honorary position at the University of Birmingham’s Cadbury Center for the Public Understanding of Religion. Michael Wear and his wife are both natives of [[Buffalo]], [[New York]]. They now reside in [[Northern Virginia]].<ref>[http://michaelwear.com/bio]</ref>
 +
 +
==Russell Moore at the National Immigration Forum==
 +
[[File:Zxcvbnm,j.PNG|thumb|400px]]
 +
[[Jeff Pickering]], [[Russell Moore]], [[Cherie Harder]], [[Michael Wear]], [[And Campaign]], [[National Immigration Forum]].
 +
@jeffpickering
 +
A conversation with
 +
@drmoore
 +
of
 +
@ERLC
 +
and
 +
@CherieHarder
 +
of
 +
@trinityforum
 +
moderated by
 +
@MichaelRWear
 +
of
 +
@AndCampaign
 +
on immigration, culture, and the ever growing need for civil discourse on these issues. #LeadingTheWay19
 +
 +
November 7, 2019.
  
 
==Co-laborers==
 
==Co-laborers==

Latest revision as of 22:57, 10 November 2019

Michael Wear


Michael Wear is married to Melissa Wear. He is the founder of Public Square Strategies LLC and the author of "Reclaiming Hope: Lessons Learned in the Obama White House About the Future of Faith in America".

Michael Wear writes for The Atlantic, Christianity Today, USA Today, Relevant Magazine and other publications on faith, politics and culture. Michael is a Senior Fellow at The Trinity Forum, and he holds an honorary position at the University of Birmingham’s Cadbury Center for the Public Understanding of Religion. Michael Wear and his wife are both natives of Buffalo, New York. They now reside in Northern Virginia.[1]

Russell Moore at the National Immigration Forum

Zxcvbnm,j.PNG

Jeff Pickering, Russell Moore, Cherie Harder, Michael Wear, And Campaign, National Immigration Forum. @jeffpickering A conversation with @drmoore of @ERLC and @CherieHarder of @trinityforum moderated by @MichaelRWear of @AndCampaign on immigration, culture, and the ever growing need for civil discourse on these issues. #LeadingTheWay19

November 7, 2019.

Co-laborers

Michael Wear

November 10, 2017 "To those I consider co-laborers"

Christianity belongs to no man. The church belongs to no man. It all belongs to Jesus. Some may have forgotten this, but let us never forget. Let us never forget that the way this world counts power and influence means nothing to our God. He will settle all accounts, we can be sure of that. This year, the story we have allowed to be told about us is what we are in reaction to the hucksters and the charlatans, but all the while we have been seeking to live a different story: who are we in relation to Christ? What are we building?

We have built so much this year as we live out our callings, as we pursue Jesus who is the standard-bearer of our faith.

I see what Jemar Tisby and Tyler Burns are building: a bold, Christ-centered Witness that is neither ashamed of the gospel, nor timid in the face of injustice.

I see what Michelle Higgins, Christina Edmondson and Ekemini Uwan are building as they generate new power through their work that is redirecting stagnant waters, and carving out new territory for Christ to work His will.

I see what Ann Voskamp is building as she stewards her influence to raise money for a radical, Preemptive Love. I saw her on a cold February morning protesting outside of a hotel where political leaders would gather to publicly pray while denying welcome to the stranger.

I see Sharon Hodde Miller and Tish Harrison Warren and Alan Noble and Duke Kwon and Scott Sauls and Sarah TheBarge and Ray Chang and Sho Baraka and Laura Turner and Trillia Newbell and Beth Moore and Charlie Dates and Wesley Hill and Matthew Loftus and Sarah Bessey and Russell Moore and Justin Giboney and on and on and on.

I see young Christians in politics who want to build their careers by faithfulness, not utilitarian power-grabbing.

I see seminary students who are pursuing sound doctrine and sound practice, who believe the gospel is for all of life and will preach a gospel that changes everything.

I see young Christians in “secular” fields who are neither arrogant because of their faith nor ashamed of it, but believe in living a life of integrated integrity in light of the security they find in Christ.[2]

And Campaign

Executive Leadership of the And Campaign in 2018:

Justin Giboney, Michael Wear, Dr. CJ Rhodes, Kori Porter

"Raise Your Voice for Religious Liberty"

July 23, 2014 | Jennifer Marshall .

This spring, the President announced he would issue an executive order regarding LGBT employment in organizations contracting with the federal government. A number of religious organizations quickly expressed concern. The policy would pose a problem for groups whose conduct standards reflect biblical teaching that reserves sexual relations for the marital union of a man and a woman. As it turns out, even raising a voice to defend religious liberty in the policy discussion would be portrayed as a problem by some.

Michael Wear, a former Obama White House and campaign staffer, helped to produce a letter to the President signed by 14 Christian leaders, including Rick Warren of Saddleback Church and Andy Crouch of Christianity Today. “Religious organizations, because of their religious faith, have served their nation well for centuries, as you have acknowledged and supported time and time again,” they reminded the President in their July 1 letter. “We hope that religious organizations can continue to do so, on equal footing with others, in the future. A religious exemption in your executive order on LGBT employment rights would allow for this.”

The executive order issued Monday by President Obama did not heed these appeals. While it did not go so far as to overturn a prior policy that allows a religious group to continue employment on the basis of its affiliation, “[l]itigation and a chilling of partnerships are predictable,” says Stanley Carlson-Thies, president of IRFA. Religious groups have contracted with the federal government to provide relief and development abroad, to provide services to the Bureau of Prisons, and to engage in research and technical assistance. How the new executive order will affect such working relationships remains to be seen.[3]

Letter to Obama

July 1, 2014 The Honorable Barack Obama President of the United States of America

c/o Melissa Rogers, Executive Director, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships

Dear Mr. President, As religious and civic leaders who seek to advance the common good, we write to urge you to include a religious exemption in your planned executive order addressing federal contractors and LGBT employment policies.

We have great appreciation for your commitment to human dignity and justice, and we share those values with you. With respect to the proposed executive order, we agree that banning discrimination is a good thing. We believe that all persons are created in the divine image of the creator, and are worthy of respect and love, without exception. Even so, it still may not be possible for all sides to reach a consensus on every issue. That is why we are asking that an extension of protection for one group not come at the expense of faith communities whose religious identity and beliefs motivate them to serve those in need.

Americans have always disagreed on important issues, but our ability to live with our diversity is part of what makes this country great, and it continues to be essential even in this 21st -century. This ability is essential in light of our national conversation on political and cultural issues related to sexuality. We have and will continue to communicate on these broader issues to our congregations, our policymakers and our nation, but we focus here on the importance of a religious exemption in your planned executive order disqualifying organizations that do not hire LGBT Americans from receiving federal contracts. This religious exemption would be comparable to what was included in the Senate version of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which passed the Senate with a strong, bipartisan vote. Without a robust religious exemption, like the provisions in the Senate-passed ENDA, this expansion of hiring rights will come at an unreasonable cost to the common good, national unity and religious freedom.

When you announced the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, you said the following: …the particular faith that motivates each of us can promote a greater good for all of us.

Instead of driving us apart, our varied beliefs can bring us together to feed the hungry and comfort the afflicted; to make peace where there is strife and rebuild what has broken; to lift up those who have fallen on hard times...

We could not agree with you more. Our identity as individuals is based first and foremost in our faith, and religious beliefs are at the foundation of some of America’s greatest charities and service organizations that do incredible good for our nation and for the world. In fact, serving the common good is one of the highest expressions of one’s religious liberty outside of worship. The hiring policies of these organizations— Christians, Jewish, Muslim and others—extend from their religious beliefs and values: the same values that motivate them to serve their neighbors in the first place.

Often, in American history--and, indeed, in partnership with your Administration-- government and religious organizations have worked together to better serve the nation. An executive order that does not include a religious exemption will significantly and substantively hamper the work of some religious organizations that are best equipped to serve in common purpose with the federal government. In a concrete way, religious organizations will lose financial funding that allows them to serve others in the national interest due to their organizational identity. When the capacity of religious organizations is limited, the common good suffers.

But our concern about an executive order without a religious exemption is about more than the direct financial impact on religious organizations. While the nation has undergone incredible social and legal change over the last decade, we still live in a nation with different beliefs about sexuality. We must find a way to respect diversity of opinion on this issue in a way that respects the dignity of all parties to the best of our ability.

There is no perfect solution that will make all parties completely happy. As we know you understand, a religious exemption in this executive order would not guarantee that religious organizations would receive contracts. Instead, a religious exemption would simply maintain that religious organizations will not be automatically disqualified or disadvantaged in obtaining contracts because of their religious beliefs.

Mr. President, during your first presidential campaign you were asked your views on same-sex marriage. You responded: “‘I believe that marriage is the union between a man and a woman. Now, for me as a Christian, it is also a sacred union. God's in the mix… I am not somebody who promotes same-sex marriage.’”

You justified withholding your support for same-sex marriage, at least in part, by appealing to your Christian faith. Yet you still believed you could serve your country, all Americans, as President. Similarly, some faith-based organizations’ religious identity requires that their employees share that identity. We still believe those organizations can serve their country, all Americans, in partnership with their government and as welcome members of the American family.

This is part of what has been so powerful about religious liberty in our nation’s history. Historically, we have been reticent as a nation to use the authority of government to bless some religious identities and ostracize others. We live in a blessed nation, constantly perfecting its fundamental ideal that no matter what god you pray to, what you look like, or who you are; there is a place in this nation for you if you seek to serve your fellow Americans.

Religious organizations, because of their religious faith, have served their nation well for centuries, as you have acknowledged and supported time and time again. We hope that religious organizations can continue to do so, on equal footing with others, in the future.

A religious exemption in your executive order on LGBT employment rights would allow for this, balancing the government’s interest in protecting both LGBT Americans, as well as the religious organizations that seek to serve in accordance with their faith and values.

Sincerely,

Values Partnerships

Joshua DuBois, head of the White House Office of Faith-based and Neigh­borhood Partnerships, stepped down from the position in early February 2013.

President Barack Obama announc­ed DuBois’ departure while speaking at the National Prayer Breakfast Feb. 7.

“Every morning he sends me via email a daily meditation – a snippet of scripture for me to reflect on,” Obama told attendees at the breakfast. “And it has meant the world to me.”

DuBois, a Pentecostal minister, worked on Obama’s first campaign in 2008 and helped organize then-candidate Obama’s outreach to religious groups. After the election, he assumed directorship of the faith-based office, a holdover from the George W. Bush administration.

DuBois plans to teach at New York University and write a book based on the spiritual reflections he sent to Obama daily. He also plans to launch a new organization with Michael Wear, also a former White House staffer in the faith-based office, that will help organizations and local governments partner with faith-based organizations, Religion News Service reported.

In a column for CNN.com, Du­Bois described the new group, Values Partnerships, as a “social enterprise.” He said it will “help public, private and nonprofit organizations bring to scale powerful, measurable partnerships with the faith community that solve big challenges, from improving public health to expanding financial literacy to reducing recidivism. We’ll also help leaders in the church and faith-based nonprofits navigate the public square around them, based on our experiences over the years.”

Added DuBois, “Finally, I’m looking forward to teaching, speaking and writing about life at the intersection of religion and politics, particularly focusing on how believers can live their faith powerfully in the world. Through trial and error, I have a few lessons to share on that point, and many still to learn.”.[5]

Promoting Illegal Immigration & Refugee Resettlement

World Relief Logo

Michael Wear signed a letter to President Trump written by World Relief.[6] titled "Top evangelical leaders and pastors from all 50 states urge action to help vulnerable immigrants" which lamented a decrease in refugees entering the United States, and requested amnesty for DACA recipients.

Letter

"Dear President Trump and Members of Congress,
"As Christian leaders, we have a commitment to caring for the vulnerable in our churches while also supporting just, compassionate and welcoming policies toward refugees and other immigrants. The Bible speaks clearly and repeatedly to God’s love and concern for the vulnerable, and also challenges us to think beyond our nationality, ethnicity or religion when loving our neighbor.
"We are committed to praying for you, our elected leaders, just as Scripture mandates (1 Timothy 2:1-2). In particular, we pray that you will not forget the following people as you craft our nation’s laws and policies:
"Dreamers. Roughly 700,000 young people are poised to lose their right to work lawfully in the U.S., not to mention their dreams of a future in this country—the country they were brought to as children, without choice. Our prayer is that these young people would be allowed to continue contributing to our society without fear of deportation.
"Refugees. We are troubled by the dramatic reduction in arrivals of refugees to the United States, which declined from 96,874 in 2016 to just 33,368 in 2017. Based on arrivals so far in this fiscal year, the United States is on track to admit the lowest number of refugees since the formalization of the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program in 1980. This, at a time when there are more refugees in the world than ever before in recorded history. Our prayer is that the U.S. would continue to be a beacon of hope for those fleeing persecution.
"Persecuted Christians. Refugees of all faiths and nationalities deserve our welcome, for they (like all human beings) are made in the image of God. We are particularly aware, though, of the Christian refugees and other minorities facing persecution in countries like Iraq, Iran and Syria. Admission of Christian refugees to the U.S. from these three countries has declined by 60%. We pray that those facing religious persecution would be protected overseas as well as in the U.S.
"Families Waiting for Reunification. God ordained the family as the cornerstone of society, and we believe that our country is stronger when our citizens can be quickly reunited with their close family members. For some U.S. citizens, the waiting period can be years or even decades. We pray you will respect the unity of the family.
"We are mindful of the difficulty of serving in public office and are grateful for your service. We ask that God would grant you wisdom and courage as you confront these and various other complex policy issues in the days and months ahead.

Signatories

External links

References