Difference between revisions of "League of Revolutionary Struggle"

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(History)
(Supporting the Rainbow)
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[[Category:Rainbow Coalition]]
 
[[Category:Rainbow Coalition]]
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==Peak influence==
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At its height, the [[League of Revolutionary Struggle]] had chapters in over a dozen cities with nearly 3,000 cadres and thousands of followers. Its newspaper, [[Unity]]/La Unidad, was published bi-monthly in three languages — English, Spanish, and Chinese.  The LRS also published [[Forward]], a theoretical journal; [[The Black Nation]]; and [[East Wind]]: Art and Politics of Asians in America.
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:''Other Unity/La Unidad pamphlets helped invigorate the resistance to the regressive politics of U.S. capitalists led by the reactionary administration of Ronald Reagan.''<ref>[https://unityarchiveproject.org/what-is-lrs/Unity Archive Project, What was the League of Revolutionary Struggle?]</ref>
  
 
==Slow demise==
 
==Slow demise==

Revision as of 17:37, 12 May 2018

Lrs-founding.jpg


League of Revolutionary Struggle dissolved into the Socialist Organizing Network and Unity Organizing Committee in 1990.

History

The League of Revolutionary Struggle was founded in 1978 and was the result of the merging of six Marxist-Leninist organizations: August 29th Movement, I Wor Kuen, Revolutionary Communist League, East Wind Organization, Sieze the Time Collective, and New York Collective. Those organizations in turn trace their roots to the Congress of Afrikan People, La Raza Unida Party and other oppressed nationality organizations of the 1960’s.

Forward

In the early 1980s Anne Adams, Carl Davidson and Michael Lee were co-editors of Forward, the magazine of the League of Revolutionary Struggle.

Supporting Black Self-Determination

Slrsop.JPG

Supporting the Rainbow

Unity March 23 1984
Unity June 20 1984

The League of Revolutionary Struggle backed Jesse Jackson for President in 1984 and 1988.

Peak influence

At its height, the League of Revolutionary Struggle had chapters in over a dozen cities with nearly 3,000 cadres and thousands of followers. Its newspaper, Unity/La Unidad, was published bi-monthly in three languages — English, Spanish, and Chinese. The LRS also published Forward, a theoretical journal; The Black Nation; and East Wind: Art and Politics of Asians in America.

Other Unity/La Unidad pamphlets helped invigorate the resistance to the regressive politics of U.S. capitalists led by the reactionary administration of Ronald Reagan.[1]

Slow demise

According to former League of Revolutionary Struggle member David Hungerford.

The League of Revolutionary Struggle continued the work of its constituent organizations through the 1980s. However, ideological and theoretical work was almost completely neglected after 1985 or so. By 1988 the LRS leadership had virtually become an appendage of Jesse Jackson’s presidential aspirations. Amiri resigned from the organization in protest. I didn’t agree with him about Jackson at the time but he proved to be right. But I think it would have been better if he had stayed in and continued the fight.
Gorbachev’s “glasnost” and the following crisis caught the LRS leadership completely unprepared. They refused to respond to demands of cadres to say something about the Soviet breakup. Instead they surrendered to bourgeois ideas and repudiated Marxism-Leninism. An attempt was made to continue the organization on a reformist basis, but without the discipline and sense of purpose that comes with Marxism-Leninism it simply faded away.[2]

Split

In 1990 League of Revolutionary Struggle split, with one group ( including most of the Asian comrades) dropping Maoism, and maintaining control of Unity, becoming the Unity Organizing Committee. The other faction kept a more traditional outlook, becoming the Socialist Organizing Network, which later merged with Freedom Road Socialist Organization .

References