Difference between revisions of "Black Lives Matter"

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'''Black Lives Matter'''
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'''Black Lives Matter''' is closely affiliated with the [[Freedom Road Socialist Organization]]/[[Liberation Road]]. The movement created a website at BlackLivesMatter.com.
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[[Category:Liberation Road]]
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==Founders==
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[[Alicia Garza]] acknowledged that she created [[#BlackLivesMatter]] with [[Patrisse Cullors]] and [[Opal Tometi]] "as a call to action for Black people after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was post-humously placed on trial for his own murder and the killer, George Zimmerman, was not held accountable for the crime he committed. It was a response to the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements."
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Garza asserts that "Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise. It is an affirmation of Black folks’ contributions to this society, our humanity, and our resilience in the face of deadly oppression." <ref>[http://www.thefeministwire.com/2014/10/blacklivesmatter-2/ The feminist Wire A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement by Alicia Garza October 7, 2014]</ref>
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==Finances==
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It is not clear if BlackLivesMatter has been incorporated as a legal entity. Whatever its legal status, it accepts donations by using IDEX [https://donate.idex.org/checkout/donation?eid=66399 as a fiscal sponsor].
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==History==
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As organizers who worked with everyday people, [[Alicia Garza]], [[Opal Tometi]], and [[Patrisse Cullors]] often saw significant gaps in the movement. Black liberation movements in this country have created room and space and leadership mostly for Black heterosexual, cisgender men, leaving women, who are often queer or transgender, either out of the movement or in the background to move the work forward with little or no recognition. As younger organizers we recognized a need to center the leadership of women. Among our movement mentors were queer and trans people whose labor had been erased and replaced with an uncontested narrative of male leadership.
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As #BlackLivesMatter developed throughout 2013 and 2014, they utilized it as a platform and organizing tool. Other groups, organizations, and individuals used it to amplify anti-Black racism across the country, in all the ways it showed up. Tamir Rice, Tanisha Anderson, Mya Hall, Walter Scott, [[Sandra Bland]] — these names are important. They’re inherently important and the space that #BlackLivesMatter held and continues to hold helped propel the conversation around the state-sanctioned violence they experienced. Particularly highlighting the egregious ways in which Black women, specifically Black trans women are violated. #BlackLivesMatter was developed in support of all Black lives.
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In 2014, Mike Brown was murdered. Cullors "stayed up all night trying to figure out how to support the brave and courageous community of Ferguson and St. Louis as they were being brutalized by law enforcement, criticized by media, tear gassed, and pepper sprayed night after night. It was a guttural response to be with my people, my family. I called some friends to see if any of them would drive with me to Ferguson. Then, [[Darnell Moore]], a good friend, said we should do a national ride during Labor Day weekend. We called it the “Black Life Matters Ride.” We put a call out to folks on the ground in St. Louis, asking whether it would be of use to have our team show up. They said yes. In 15 days we developed a plan of action to head to the occupied territory to support our brothers and sisters. THIS INCLUDED us spending time, in community, with St. Louis-based organizations as well as individuals we connected with who were on the ground in St. Louis. We asked them to let us know what their needs were and to tell us exactly how our presence could best be utilized to elevate their plight. Our goal was to amplify their work and not distract attention away from it. Over 600 people gathered. One of the most powerful displays of collective power were the moments local STL leaders met with and provided guidance to those of us who traveled from out of town. We made two commitments upon our return to our homes: to support the team on the ground in St. Louis and to go back home and do the work there. We understood Ferguson was not an aberration but, in fact, a clear point of reference for what was happening to Black communities everywhere."
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When it was time for us to leave, inspired by our friends in Ferguson, organizers from 18 different cities went back home and developed [[Black Lives Matter]] (BLM) chapters in their communities and towns — broadening the political will and movement building reach catalyzed by the #BlackLivesMatter project and the work on the ground in Ferguson. It became clear that there was a need to continue organizing and building Black power across the country. People were hungry to galvanize their communities to end state-sanctioned violence against Black people, the way Ferguson organizers and allies were doing. Soon after, Opal, Alicia, Darnell and I helped create the BLM network infrastructure. It is adaptive and decentralized with a set of guiding principles. Our goal is to support the development of new Black leaders as well as create a network where Black people feel empowered to determine our destinies in our communities.
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The project I co-created with Alicia and Opal is now the Black Lives Matter National Network with over 30 chapters both stateside and internationally. As co-creators and a network, we have consistently pushed and elevated the community of St. Louis and will continue to do so, taking personally the responsibility of uplifting the stories and experiences of those who contributed to building this powerful movement moment. People across the world have shown up to be on the front lines in moving Black people closer to liberation, albeit iteratively.<ref>[https://medium.com/@patrissemariecullorsbrignac/we-didn-t-start-a-movement-we-started-a-network-90f9b5717668#.kqtcnbi85 We didn’t start a movement. We started a network]</ref>
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==Freedom Road connection==
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[[File:Blackfrso.JPG|thumb|400px]]
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[[Freedom Road Socialist Organization]] is a guiding force behind [[Black Lives Matter]].
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[[Category:Freedom Road Socialist Organization]]
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==Communist Party infiltration==
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In a Janary 24 2018 article on the [[Communist Party USA]] website "Survey says, CPUSA members want to be heard" [[John Bachtell]] wrote;<ref>[http://www.cpusa.org/article/survey-says-cpusa-members-want-to-be-heard/]</ref>
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:''Most members are involved in their communities and in a range of labor, social justice, environmental and peace organizations.''
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:''Among the labor activists are trade union leaders and members of central labor councils, retiree organizations, [[Jobs with Justice]] and the [[Fight for 15]].''
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:''Others are involved in feminist organizations including [[Planned Parenthood]], defense of abortion clinics and the new #MeToo movement.''
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:''Many are involved in racial justice groups including [[Black Lives Matter]] and the [[NAACP]], immigrant rights, LGTBQ organizations and disability rights groups.
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''
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:''Members were involved with [[Bernie Sanders]] campaign and are continuing their activism in [[Our Revolution]], [[Swing Left]], [[Indivisible]], [[Working Families Party]], statewide groups like the [[New Virginia Majority]] and local [[Democratic Party]] groups and 2018 electoral campaigns.''
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:''Several members are elected officials.''
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==The Movement for Black Lives==
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The "Movement for Black Lives" conference was held in [[Cleveland]] [[Ohio]], July 24-26, 2015.
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===Program===
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[[File:Black lives.PNG|thumb|300px|]]
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'''Friday, July 24'''
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*EXCLUSIVE SNEAK PEAK OF NEW DOCUMENTARY: "Whose Streets?" by Damon Davis, [[Damon Davis]]
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*Emotional Emancipation Circles: Weekly Support Groups for Black People to Process Racial Stress,  [[Erika Totten]]
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*Black Side of the Red Ribbon: HIV/AIDS Activism for Black Lives Past, Present and Future [[Maxx Boykin]]: [[HIV Prevention Justice Alliance]] & [[Black Youth Project 100]],  [[Kenyon Farrow]]: [[Treatment Action Group]],  [[Waheedah Shabazz-el]]: [[ACT-UP Philly]] & [[US Positive Women's Network]], [[Deon Haywood]]: [[Women With a Vision]]
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*Where can we go from here: intentional sharing of power within 501(c)(3) structures
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*Let Your Motto Be Resistance! Why Folks Are Saying We Will Shoot Back [[Darasia Selby-Adebisi]]: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] Philly Chapter,  [[Jamal P. Oliver]]: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] NY Chapter,  [[Jonathan Stith]]: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] DC Chapter, [[Sanyika Bryant]]: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] Oakland Chapter, [[Taliba Obuya]]: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] Atlanta Chapter
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*Street Dance Activism in the Black Lives Matter Movement,  [[Shamell Bell]] and [[Black Lives Matter]] members
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*The Revolutionary conversation: a theatrical jazz retrospect with [[Audre James]],  [[Jonathan Lykes]], [[JeNae' Taylor]]
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*Bone-Weary and Cried Out: Healing Space, [[Shemariah Arki]],  [[June Cara Christian]]
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*Building Self Care and Resilience through Mindfulness, Movement and Meditation, [[Kelsie Augustin]],  [[Kellie Kirksey]]
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*Healing from Black Church Trauma in the Quest For Black Liberation, [[Latishia AV James|Latishia James]]
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*How Farming Saved My Life & Made Me Aware of My Blackness, [[Kelly Carlisle]]
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* #BlackWorkersMatter: The State of Black Worker Organizing in the U.S, [[Sean Thomas-Breitfeld]]: Co-Director - Building Movement Project & Lead Author -[[#BlackWorkersMatter]],  [[Kimberly Freeman Brown]]: President - KFB Consulting LLC & Author - And Still I Rise, [[Marc D. Bayard]]: Director of the Black Worker Initiative - [[Institute for Policy Studies]]
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*Developing Your Policy Agenda, [[Samuel Sinyangwe]]
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*Free From Fear: Dangerous Homosexuals Building Power in Da' South to address profiling and the municipal court, [[Bri Carter]], [[Brinn Frazier]], [[Southerners On New Ground]]: [[Mary Hooks]],  [[Cazembe Jackson]], [[Mickey Jordan]], [[Serena Sebring]], [[Eshe Shakur]], [[Tiffany Smith]], [[Dean Stead]],  [[Kiesha Webb]], [[Rebecca Wooten]]
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*How to Build Decentralized Networks in the Black Lives Matter Movement, [[Monica Dennis]], [[Carmen Dixon]], [[Allen Frimpong]]
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*Facilitation 101,  [[Maurice Moe Mitchell]], [[Cyndi Suarez]]
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*Organizing 101,  [[Nelini Stamp]]
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*Solidarity is a Verb, Collaboration is a Practice, [[Patrisse Cullors]], [[Elle Hearns]]
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*There’s A Method to the Movement: Examining Community Organizing Methods and Methodologies [[Chaka Holley]]
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*Young Gifted and Black: The real #DearWhitePeople [[Rian Brown]]
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*Organizing for Resilience: Supporting survivors and families to move through trauma and lead political change [[Ejeris Dixon]]
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*Movie Screening and discussion-Out In The Night- The story of the New Jersey 4
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*The Art of Revolution: Collectively Organizing for Reproductive Justice At The Intersection of Art and Activism, [[Monica Raye Simpson]], [[Camil Williams]]
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*The Miseducation of Hip-Hop, [[Tierney Reed]]
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*Legos & Monopoly: Mastering Your Inside/Outside Strategy, Gaming the Political System & Winning, [[Maria Fernandez]], [[Theodore Moore]]
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*Mothers Cry for Justice, [[Anita Willis]]
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*Self-Defense,  [[Emily Carpenter]]
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*This Ain’t A Eulogy: A Ritual for Remembering, [[Taja Lindley]]
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*(RE) Education of the Negro: Developing Political Education Programs for Black Communities, [[David C. Turner III]]
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*Black Lives Beyond Borders: Statelessness and Deportations in The Dominican Republic, [[Black Alliance for Just Immigration]], [[We Are All Dominicans]]
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*Decriminalization of Weed & Weed Reparations, [[Todd St. Hill]],  [[Jasson Perez]]
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*Strategies For Transformation: Divest From Police/Invest in Communities, [[Carmen Dixon]],  [[Ben Ndugga-Kabuye]],  [[Opal Tometi]]
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*The 2016 Election: How to Make a Concrete Impact and Build Capacity for Black Organizing: [[Black Youth Project 100]], Charlene Carruthers: [[Black Youth Project 100]],  [[Cedric Lawson]]: [[The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights]]
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*The Black Panther Party: Looking Back To Look Forward, [[Hank Jones]]: Former Member of [[Black Panther Party]],  [[Pam Hannah]]: Former member of the [[Black Panther Party]],  [[Ashanti Alston]]: Former member of the [[Black Panther Party]] & former political prisoner,  [[Dhoruba Bin-Wahad]]: Former member of the [[Black Panther Party]] & former political prisoner)
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*What Assata Really Taught Me: Gender, Sexuality, and Nationalism, [[Asha Bandele]],  [[Beatriz Beckford]], [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] - [[Dara Cooper]], [[Autumn Marie]], [[Taliba Obuya]],  [[Ola Ronke]]
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*Black Trans* Lives Matter!: Solutions Not Punishment Coaltion
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*Building a Peoples Security Team,  [[Che Long]]
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*Building Black Women’s Leadership: Strategies to strengthen our leadership individually and collectively [[Charlene Carruthers]]: [[Black Youth Project 100]]
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*ENCRYPT BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY: surveillance self defense & security culture 101 [[Gemini Matt]]
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*Even My Poems Are Revolutionary, [[J Mase III]]
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*Mapping Police Violence [[Samuel Sinyangwe]] and [[Johnetta Elzie]]
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*Online Tools and Tactics to Supercharge Your Campaigns, William Winters
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*Queer As Fuck: We Been Here, [[Tyrell Cooper]], [[Shan Davis]],  [[Ashleigh Shackelford]]
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*The Black Church: We need you now more than ever!, [[Mary Hooks]]: Community Organizer-SONG,  Dr. [[Makungu M. Akinyela]]: Ordained Elder - AME Church and [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]]
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*Turn Down on Eachother, Turn up on the State: Conflict Resolution 101,  [[Alicia Garza]]
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*Putting the T back in Black, [[Elle Hearns]], [[Janetta Johnson]],  [[Miss Major]]
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*Imagining the Win,  DeRay,  Netta,  Sam
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'''Saturday, July 25'''
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*I Wish I Knew How It Feels To Be Free: Part 1
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*Feelin’ My Femme: Fighting Femmephobia in the Land,  [[Jessica Lewis]]
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*Pondering for Our Ancestor: [[Rashidah Tutashinda]] Bay Area Chapter of BLM and Co-founder of Ancestral Healing,  [[Rashidah Tutashinda]]
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*Centering Black Women and Trans People’s Experience of Racial Profiling and Police Violence in the Movement for Black Lives,  [[Mariame Kaba]] (pending),  [[Charlene Carruthers]],  [[Andrea Ritchie]], [[Ashley Yates]]
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*Communications Nuts and Bolts: [[Shannon Garth-Rhodes]]
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*Whose World is This? The World is Ours, [[Jamilah Brown]], [[Nathaniel Phillipps]], [[Shannon Shird]], [[Tsige Tafesse]]
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*Cultivating Joy: Free, Black & Communing through Theatre: [[Shamilia McBean]], [[Dorcas Davis]]
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*Cultural Alchemy 101: The Root,  [[Mya Hunter]], [[Heather Lee]], [[Umar Muhammad]], [[Paul Newman]], [[Paul Newman]]
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*Making All Black Lives Matter: Merging and Intersecting Movements to End Criminalization,  [[Diane Burkholder]],  [[Jasmine Burnett]], [[Kenyon Farrow]] , [[Treatment Action Group]], [[Deon Haywood]],  [[Women With a Vision Inc]], [[New Voices Pittsburgh]]: [[Women of Color for Reproductive Justice]], [[One Struggle KC/KC AIDS Taskforce]]
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*Womens Work: Heartivism and Healing [[Donna Davis]],  [[Ashley Grenne]],  [[Crystal Wilson]]
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*Antiblackness: Theories and Strategies for Abolition: [[Page May]] & [[Jasson Perez]], [[Tyrell Cooper]], [[Shan Davis]],  [[Ashleigh Shackelford]]
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*Black Scholar-Activism in the 21st Century: Dr. [[Tabitha Chester]], Dr. [[Treva Lindsey]]
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*Our Money, Our Voices: Public Budgets for Racial Justice,  [[Maria Hadden]]
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*Post-Rachel Complex: Remaining the landscape of allyship in this Black Lives Matters moment, [[Paury Flowers]], [[Erica Mines]],  [[Laniece Williams]]
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* #BlackKidsLivesMatter Part 2: Revolutionary Parenting, [[Amara Abdullah]], [[Melina Abdullah]], [[Thandiwe Abdullah]]
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*And I showed up #SayHerName, [[JeNae' Taylor]] and [[Jonathan Lykes]]
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*CANCELED: #BlackKidsLivesMatter Part 1: Packing Backpacks for Rebellion and Revolution, [[LeRoi Newbold]], [[Kandace Price]]
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*Don’t Talk About it, Be About it: Calling Out and Ending Systemic Racism: [[Cuyahoga PlaceMatters Team]]
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*Engaging Policy Makers Around Issues of Police Militarization: [[Million Hoodies Movement for Justice]]
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*International Decade for People of African Descent and the National Plan of Action:[[Jonathan Stith]].  [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] DC Chapter, [[Sanyika Bryant]] [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] Oakland Chapter, Taliba Obuya: [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]] Atlanta Chapter
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*Liberation Can't Wait: How Black Queer and trans folks can and must be at the forefront of the movement towards LGBTQ liberation and full equality.
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*Riding Through the 6 Wit My Woes: Anti- Black Racism in Canada and Beyond: [[Janaya  Khan]]
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*The 60th Anniversary of Emmet Till’s Murder: From Emmet Till to Rekia Boyd, Extrajudicial Killings & Black Resistance, [[Airickca Gordon-Taylor]], [[Martinez Sutton]] - Brother of [[Rekia Boyd]], [[Brock Satter]] - [[Mass Action Against Police Brutality]],  [[Aislinn Pulley]] - [[Black Lives Matter]] Chicago, [[Brian Taylor]] - [[Black Lives Matter]]  Cincinnati,  cousin of Emmett Till and Executive Director at [[Mamie Till Mobley Memorial Foundation]]
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*The People, United, Shall Never be Defeated: How to craft a Black Revolutionary consensus for the 21st Century, [[Toussaint Losier]]
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*WE WHO BELIEVE IN FREEDOM COINTELPRO 101 & US POLITICAL PRISONERS: When We Fight Back & The State Strikes Back, [[Fred Hampton, Jr.]] (Son of Chairman [[Fred Hampton]]),  [[Ramona Africa]] ([[MOVE]] Sole Survivor of the government's 1985 bombing of MOVE), [[Ashanti Alston]] (Former Black Panther/[[Black Liberation Army]],  former Political Prisoner), [[Eddie Conway]] (Former Black Panther/Former Political Prisoner),  [[Russell Maroon Shoatz]] (Son of US Political Prisoner [[Russell Shoatz]])
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*Welcome to America; Black Immigrant Experience of Anti-Black & Anti-Immigrant State Violence in the US: [[Devonte Jackson]],  [[Black Alliance for Just Immigration]] + [[Black Immigration Network]] members [[Ben Ndugga-Kabuye]],  [[Marybeth Onyeukwu]],  [[Tia Oso]],  [[Abraham Paulos]], [[Opal Tometi]], [[Aly Wane]]
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*What had happened was… Building tools for collective accountability: [[Che Long]]
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*African Female Revolutionaries and their Lessons for the Movement, [[Kopano Marumo]] and [[Rooney Hasaan]]
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*Shade & Shoutouts: Popular Culture and Social Issues: [[Ashleigh Shackelford]], [[Tyrell Cooper]]
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*MOVIE SCREENING and Discussion- Panther Vanguard of the Revolution- is an essential history and a vibrant chronicle of this pivotal movement that birthed a new revolutionary culture in America
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*CANCELED: Black/Land in Cleveland, [[Mistinguette Smith]]
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*Justifiable Homicide: Building A Movement With The Families Affected By State Sanction Violence Workshop Leader [[Cephus Johnson]]  “Uncle Bobby” (Oscar Grant Uncle)
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*Shots Fired: How Can You Respond?, [[Ujimaa Medics]]
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*Direct Action Play Lab, [[Celeste Faison]], [[Chinyere Tutashinda]]
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*Black, Trans and Brilliant: A Space For Us to Connect , [[Wriply M. Bennet]], [[J Mase III]],  [[Aaryn Lang]]
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*Black Lives Trauma - Addressing Our Hurt to Heal, [[Jonathan Projansky]]
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*Elixirs for Black Brilliance and Resilience, [[Jasmine Burems]]
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*Intimacy with Food,  [[Alsie Parks]]
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*Revolution Begins Within (Yoga): [[Olaronke Akinmowo]]
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*The Somatics of Black Liberation (Yoga),  [[Rachel Lee]]
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*Black minds Matter: How the educational industrial complex is destroying young black minds, [[LaToia Jones]]
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*HIV is Not a Crime – Or is it? { Intersecting HIV, Criminalization and Race, [[Deon Haywood]], [[Bryan C. Jones]]
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*[[Jackson Rising]]: A case study of the Jackson-Kush Plan [[Malcolm X Grassroots Movement]]
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*Making Justice: How Reparations for Police Torture Survivors Were Won, [[Mariame Kaba]], [[Page May]]
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*Organizing for Self-Determination: Bldg a Nat'l Agenda for Blk Food & Land, Dara, [[Beatriz Beckford]]
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*Beyond IDFWU: best practices for collaboration in a Black led movement
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*Black Community Control Over the Police, [[M. Adams]],  [[Max Rameau]]
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*Black Lives Matter: Race and Inequality is a Labor Issue,  [[Carmen Berkley]]: Director of Civil, Human and Woman’s Rights—[[AFL-CIO]], [[Ephrin Jenkins]]: [[United Steel Workers]] Local #1014, [[Yanela Sims]]: [[Service Employees International Union]] Local 1 • [[Darrin Spann]]: Executive Assistant to President -AFSCME Council 13, [[Cherika Carter:]] Field Representative-Ohio [[AFL-CIO]]
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*Black Love, Black Leadership, Black Power: Rebuilding the Black Liberation Movement [[Sendolo Diaminah]],  [[Denise Perry]]
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*Black Radical Women and Revolutionary Movement Building: Critical Insights and Actions, [[Rose Brewer]]
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*Check Your Bias: Ending American Denial of Racism, [[Erika Maye]]
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*Conscious Leadership: Grappling with Work-Life Dilemma Using the power of Life Mapping, [[Monika Moss-Gransberry]]
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*Freedom from Violence is Reproductive Justice: Advancing the Human rights of Black women and people in Cleveland
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*New Voices: [[La'Tasha D. Mayes]]- Founder and Executive Director [[Global Black Struggles]]
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*Towards a Black Feminist Future: Co-creating a National Black Feminist Strategy [[Paris Hatcher]]
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* #blackcommafeminist: Let’s Fuck Up Some Commas [[Shemariah Arki]]
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'''Sunday, July 26'''
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 +
*We Gon' Be Alright: Visions of a Black Future
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*I Wish I Knew How It Feels To Be Free: Part 2
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*Art as Movement Work: Art and Culture for Black Lives
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*Making Resilience and Resistane Work: Healing for Black Lives
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*Creating a National Platform for Black Lives
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*Global Movement Building: International Advocacy and the Global Movement for Black Lives
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*Liberating Our Minds: Building Alternative Political Structures
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*Local Power: Policy Priorities and Coordination for Black Lives, [[Nelini Stamp]]
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* #Shutitdown: Building a National Action Table
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*Electric Melanin: Technology and Black Freedom,  [[Dante Barry]], [[Rashad Robinson]]
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*Movement Building: Creating Bases & Black Networks Across Regions [[Charlene Carruthers]]: [[Black Youth Project 100]], [[Ash-Lee Henderson]]
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*Telling Our Stories: Communications Strategies & Narratives
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*Strengthening The Movement in Cleveland, [[Malaya Davis]]
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*Movement For Black Lives Convening Closing<ref>[ http://movementforblacklives.org/schedule/speakers/Movement for Black Lives conference program, accessed November 20, 2015]</ref>
  
 
==Visiting the White House==
 
==Visiting the White House==
 
President Obama’s senior adviser [[Valerie Jarrett]] met with [[Black Lives Matter]] activists September 16, 2015 at the White House, the latest sign that the Obama administration is involved with the controversial protest group.
 
President Obama’s senior adviser [[Valerie Jarrett]] met with [[Black Lives Matter]] activists September 16, 2015 at the White House, the latest sign that the Obama administration is involved with the controversial protest group.
  
Jarrett met with three organizers for [[Campaign Zero]]. [[DeRay Mckesson]], [[Brittany Packnett]], and [[Johnetta Elzie]] as well as [[Phil Agnew]] of the [[Dream Defenders]] and [[Jamye Wooten]], an organizer for [[Baltimore United for Change]] were there, according to a senior White House official who confirmed the visit to Buzzfeed.
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Jarrett met with three organizers for [[Campaign Zero]]. [[DeRay Mckesson]], [[Brittany Packnett]], and [[Johnetta Elzie]] as well as [[Phillip Agnew]] of the [[Dream Defenders]] and [[Jamye Wooten]], an organizer for [[Baltimore United for Change]] were there, according to a senior White House official who confirmed the visit to Buzzfeed.
  
 
After the meeting, Packnett tweeted a selfie with Jarrett thanking her for engaging the movement.
 
After the meeting, Packnett tweeted a selfie with Jarrett thanking her for engaging the movement.
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Packnett was also selected as a member of Obama’s presidential task force on 21st century policing – and has a long record of activism in St. Louis including some time spent in Washington D.C.<ref>[http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/09/17/valerie-jarrett-meets-black-lives-matter-leaders-white-house/ Breitbart News Valerie Jarrett Meets With Black Lives Matter Leaders At The White House. by Charlie Spiering17 Sep 2015]</ref>
 
Packnett was also selected as a member of Obama’s presidential task force on 21st century policing – and has a long record of activism in St. Louis including some time spent in Washington D.C.<ref>[http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/09/17/valerie-jarrett-meets-black-lives-matter-leaders-white-house/ Breitbart News Valerie Jarrett Meets With Black Lives Matter Leaders At The White House. by Charlie Spiering17 Sep 2015]</ref>
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==References==
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{{reflist|2}}

Latest revision as of 13:29, 3 October 2020

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Black Lives Matter is closely affiliated with the Freedom Road Socialist Organization/Liberation Road. The movement created a website at BlackLivesMatter.com.

Founders

Alicia Garza acknowledged that she created #BlackLivesMatter with Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi "as a call to action for Black people after 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was post-humously placed on trial for his own murder and the killer, George Zimmerman, was not held accountable for the crime he committed. It was a response to the anti-Black racism that permeates our society and also, unfortunately, our movements."

Garza asserts that "Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise. It is an affirmation of Black folks’ contributions to this society, our humanity, and our resilience in the face of deadly oppression." [1]

Finances

It is not clear if BlackLivesMatter has been incorporated as a legal entity. Whatever its legal status, it accepts donations by using IDEX as a fiscal sponsor.

History

As organizers who worked with everyday people, Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi, and Patrisse Cullors often saw significant gaps in the movement. Black liberation movements in this country have created room and space and leadership mostly for Black heterosexual, cisgender men, leaving women, who are often queer or transgender, either out of the movement or in the background to move the work forward with little or no recognition. As younger organizers we recognized a need to center the leadership of women. Among our movement mentors were queer and trans people whose labor had been erased and replaced with an uncontested narrative of male leadership.

As #BlackLivesMatter developed throughout 2013 and 2014, they utilized it as a platform and organizing tool. Other groups, organizations, and individuals used it to amplify anti-Black racism across the country, in all the ways it showed up. Tamir Rice, Tanisha Anderson, Mya Hall, Walter Scott, Sandra Bland — these names are important. They’re inherently important and the space that #BlackLivesMatter held and continues to hold helped propel the conversation around the state-sanctioned violence they experienced. Particularly highlighting the egregious ways in which Black women, specifically Black trans women are violated. #BlackLivesMatter was developed in support of all Black lives.

In 2014, Mike Brown was murdered. Cullors "stayed up all night trying to figure out how to support the brave and courageous community of Ferguson and St. Louis as they were being brutalized by law enforcement, criticized by media, tear gassed, and pepper sprayed night after night. It was a guttural response to be with my people, my family. I called some friends to see if any of them would drive with me to Ferguson. Then, Darnell Moore, a good friend, said we should do a national ride during Labor Day weekend. We called it the “Black Life Matters Ride.” We put a call out to folks on the ground in St. Louis, asking whether it would be of use to have our team show up. They said yes. In 15 days we developed a plan of action to head to the occupied territory to support our brothers and sisters. THIS INCLUDED us spending time, in community, with St. Louis-based organizations as well as individuals we connected with who were on the ground in St. Louis. We asked them to let us know what their needs were and to tell us exactly how our presence could best be utilized to elevate their plight. Our goal was to amplify their work and not distract attention away from it. Over 600 people gathered. One of the most powerful displays of collective power were the moments local STL leaders met with and provided guidance to those of us who traveled from out of town. We made two commitments upon our return to our homes: to support the team on the ground in St. Louis and to go back home and do the work there. We understood Ferguson was not an aberration but, in fact, a clear point of reference for what was happening to Black communities everywhere."

When it was time for us to leave, inspired by our friends in Ferguson, organizers from 18 different cities went back home and developed Black Lives Matter (BLM) chapters in their communities and towns — broadening the political will and movement building reach catalyzed by the #BlackLivesMatter project and the work on the ground in Ferguson. It became clear that there was a need to continue organizing and building Black power across the country. People were hungry to galvanize their communities to end state-sanctioned violence against Black people, the way Ferguson organizers and allies were doing. Soon after, Opal, Alicia, Darnell and I helped create the BLM network infrastructure. It is adaptive and decentralized with a set of guiding principles. Our goal is to support the development of new Black leaders as well as create a network where Black people feel empowered to determine our destinies in our communities.

The project I co-created with Alicia and Opal is now the Black Lives Matter National Network with over 30 chapters both stateside and internationally. As co-creators and a network, we have consistently pushed and elevated the community of St. Louis and will continue to do so, taking personally the responsibility of uplifting the stories and experiences of those who contributed to building this powerful movement moment. People across the world have shown up to be on the front lines in moving Black people closer to liberation, albeit iteratively.[2]

Freedom Road connection

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Freedom Road Socialist Organization is a guiding force behind Black Lives Matter.

Communist Party infiltration

In a Janary 24 2018 article on the Communist Party USA website "Survey says, CPUSA members want to be heard" John Bachtell wrote;[3]

Most members are involved in their communities and in a range of labor, social justice, environmental and peace organizations.
Among the labor activists are trade union leaders and members of central labor councils, retiree organizations, Jobs with Justice and the Fight for 15.
Others are involved in feminist organizations including Planned Parenthood, defense of abortion clinics and the new #MeToo movement.
Many are involved in racial justice groups including Black Lives Matter and the NAACP, immigrant rights, LGTBQ organizations and disability rights groups.

Members were involved with Bernie Sanders campaign and are continuing their activism in Our Revolution, Swing Left, Indivisible, Working Families Party, statewide groups like the New Virginia Majority and local Democratic Party groups and 2018 electoral campaigns.
Several members are elected officials.

The Movement for Black Lives

The "Movement for Black Lives" conference was held in Cleveland Ohio, July 24-26, 2015.

Program

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Friday, July 24

Saturday, July 25

Sunday, July 26

  • We Gon' Be Alright: Visions of a Black Future
  • I Wish I Knew How It Feels To Be Free: Part 2
  • Art as Movement Work: Art and Culture for Black Lives
  • Making Resilience and Resistane Work: Healing for Black Lives
  • Creating a National Platform for Black Lives
  • Global Movement Building: International Advocacy and the Global Movement for Black Lives
  • Liberating Our Minds: Building Alternative Political Structures
  • Local Power: Policy Priorities and Coordination for Black Lives, Nelini Stamp
  • #Shutitdown: Building a National Action Table
  • Electric Melanin: Technology and Black Freedom, Dante Barry, Rashad Robinson
  • Movement Building: Creating Bases & Black Networks Across Regions Charlene Carruthers: Black Youth Project 100, Ash-Lee Henderson
  • Telling Our Stories: Communications Strategies & Narratives
  • Strengthening The Movement in Cleveland, Malaya Davis
  • Movement For Black Lives Convening Closing[4]

Visiting the White House

President Obama’s senior adviser Valerie Jarrett met with Black Lives Matter activists September 16, 2015 at the White House, the latest sign that the Obama administration is involved with the controversial protest group.

Jarrett met with three organizers for Campaign Zero. DeRay Mckesson, Brittany Packnett, and Johnetta Elzie as well as Phillip Agnew of the Dream Defenders and Jamye Wooten, an organizer for Baltimore United for Change were there, according to a senior White House official who confirmed the visit to Buzzfeed.

After the meeting, Packnett tweeted a selfie with Jarrett thanking her for engaging the movement.

“Great meeting, Brittany. Truly appreciate your leadership!!” Jarrett replied on Twitter. Packnett has six recorded entries of visiting the complex long before the protests in Ferguson. She also was among the select group of Ferguson activists that met with Obama in December 2014. “I could tell he is taking this very personally,” Packnett explained after the 45 minute meeting with the president in the Oval Office. “He wants to see some clear, thoughtful action come from this.”

She also revealed that Obama sympathized with the movement, thanks to his background as a community organizer in Chicago.

“He offered us a lot of encouragement with his background as a community organizer, and told us that even incremental changes were progress,” she told reporters after the meeting. “He didn’t want us to get discouraged. He said, ‘Keep speaking truth to power.’”

Packnett was also selected as a member of Obama’s presidential task force on 21st century policing – and has a long record of activism in St. Louis including some time spent in Washington D.C.[5]

References