Roberta Wood

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Roberta Wood


Roberta Wood is a Chicago Communist Party USA member and is the wife of Scott Marshall. She is a trustee for the United Steelworkers of America.[1]

A lifelong rank and file union activist, Roberta co-founded the steelworker women's caucus in the in the Chicago/Gary district of the Steelworkers union. In 1976 she was elected the first female member of USWA Local 65's Executive Board. Following the closing of U.S. Steel's South Works mill, Roberta worked until retirement as an electrical instrumentation mechanic in a municipal sewage treament facility[2].

Second Venceremos Brigade

In 1970 Roberta Wood from Maryland, was a member of the second Venceremos Brigade to Cuba.[3]

Steelworker struggles

Paul Kaczocha was barely 21 when I first met Ed Sadlowski. Al Samter, a U.S. Steel coke oven worker with a long history of struggle in the mill and the union, asked me if he could bring Ed over to talk to me about his campaign to run for director of District 31 of the Steelworkers. The district which covered the Gary-Chicago area, District 31, was the largest.

Al was a veteran of union struggles. He was a former Bronx New Yorker who, as a young newlywed communist, had moved to Gary in 1949 to be a union activist.

Al brought Ed, 12 years my senior, to my apartment in Gary one summer evening. I remember thinking that Ed, who at the time was an overweight staff representative for the union, was the stereotypic fat cat union rep. However, he talked the talk of trying to change the union and take out the same people who had run the district for the 30 years since the union’s inception.

I was spellbound as Ed’s rap touched a nerve in me. I was a young new union representative at a shop full of young people at a plant that was the newest built basic steel mill in the U.S. – Bethlehem Steel’s Burns Harbor, Indiana plant. It remains the last basic steel mill built in the U.S. making steel with coke ovens and blast furnaces and finishing it in rolling mills.

Like Ed’s father, my grandfather helped build the union. He had been a staff representative for the same district that Ed was trying to lead. My grandfather warned me to stay away from Ed because, he said, he hung out with communists. Ed convinced me to join the cause of changing the union by taking it over. “You CAN beat City Hall,” he was fond of saying.

Like me, hundreds of steelworkers became convinced that change was possible. We went into action around the district to organize for the Sadlowski campaign, a movement which became bigger than Ed himself.

Organizing for the February 1973 election was fast and furious. It was done out of South Chicago at a campaign office down the street from the U.S. Steel Local 65 hall where Ed was once the president and where he got his nickname “Oil-Can Eddie.” It was a hall that was named after Hilding Anderson, a 29-year-old known as a red in some circles. Hilding Anderson, along with nine others, was killed by the police at the 1937 Memorial Day Massacre.

My local was one of the first to nominate Ed to get him on the ballot, and the local’s election vote also went for him. However, the election was fraught with corruption. Ed was declared the loser by a narrow margin. He immediately filed a federal law suit which was settled with a federally supervised election held in November 1974.

Organizing continued after the loss in ’73. The momentum built by all the new people energized by the first campaign made for a landslide win in the rematch between the “official” candidate, Sam Evett, and Ed. Leading this organizing, as in the first match, were Jim Balanoff from Inland Steel’s Local 1010, Jim’s brother Clem Balanoff, Ola Kennedy, Curtis Strong, one of the first African Americans appointed to the USWA staff, Cliff Mezo, also from 1010, a fresh young Pennsylvania attorney, George Terrell, and an assortment of old and young union activists, men and women, Black and Brown.

Rank and file caucuses eventually sprung up in local unions across District 31 which spanned metropolitan Chicago through Indiana, from Hammond, East Chicago and Gary to South Bend. A compilation of many of those local organizations was even formed later on, called the Indiana Steelworkers Caucus.

Immediately after Ed was elected director, the campaign for the 1977 USWA international president began. The rank-and-file energy of the district campaign, “Steelworkers Fightback,” spread across the U.S. and Canada. The national campaign brought in old union activists like George Edwards from Cleveland and young ones too, like Bruce Bostick at U.S. Steel in Lorain, Ohio.

Based on the movement, the 1976 local union elections brought many new faces to the union leadership, like Bill Andrews and Mike Olszanski at Local 1010, including my election for Local 6787 president. Ed had been convinced by George Troy, who became financial secretary of our local, and me one night in Chicago to give a written endorsement of our slate in that election. Those new leaders and the rebel old ones went to the convention in Las Vegas to try and change the union. A lot of hell was raised on the convention floor in Las Vegas from locals across the country. The stage was set for the January election the following year.

Sensing this surge of opposition and responding to the pressure, the “Official Family” added another vice president position to the Board which they filled with Leon Lynch, an African American union representative who had originated in District 31.

Campaigning by Ed took on a scope larger than running for president of the U.S., since the Union spanned not only coast to coast but also Canada. But the election was lost. Many involved in the campaign felt it was stolen in Canada.

The narrow loss of “Steelworkers Fightback” did not stop the push for reform in the union. Women such as Roberta Wood and Alice Peurala, both of Local 65, became more involved and formed an active Women’s Caucus. Alice was elected president of Local 65, the first woman to head a basic steel local. Eventually, the right to vote on the contract was won and women were elected to international offices of authority. The Steelworkers Union was 1.5 million strong at the time of the Sadlowski presidential bid.[4]

Supporting John Lumpkin

In 1978, Roberta Wood was treasurer of the Committee to Elect Dr. John R. Lumpkin for the 7th Ward Alderman, Chicago.[5]

Communist Party Labor Day call

The Communist Party USA paper People's Weekly World issued a statement to mark Labor Day 1995, entitled "We honor the dead and fight like hell for the living."

Of the more than 100 endorsers listed, almost all were identified members of the Communist Party USA.

Roberta Wood, IBEW Local 9 Chicago, was on the list.[6]

Birthday Greetings to William "Red" Davis

In December 1995 the Communist Party USA newspaper Peoples Weekly World published a page of 75th birthday greetings to William (Red) Davis - "Lifelong working class fighter and Communist"

In the fight for the unity and integrity of the Party in St. Louis, Missouri, in the post-war years, "Red" has been a rock of confidence and commitment to building the Communist Party.

Greetings were sent from Roberta Wood of Illinois[7].

Endorsed Communist Party Call

On March 30 2002 the Communist Party USA paper People’s Weekly World called for a national holiday in honor of late Farm Workers Union leader Cesar Chavez. The article was followed by a long list of endorsers[8]including Roberta Wood, Almost all endorsers were confirmed members of the Communist Party USA.

Communist Party USA

In September 2006 the Peoples Weekly World[9]listed several members, or supporters of the Illinois Communist Party USA.

Joan Elbert, Barbara Russum, Bea Lumpkin, William Appelhans, Bill Mackovich, Carolyn Black, Carroll Krois, Dee Myles , Doug Freedman, Frank Lumpkin, John Bachtell, Kevin Collins, Lance Cohn, Mark Almberg, Marguerite Horberg, Martha Pedroza, Mike Giocondo, Pepe Lozano, Roberta Wood, Scott Marshall, Shelby Richardson, Sijisfredo Aviles, Sue Webb, Terrie Albano.

Roberta Wood has served as Secretary Treasurer of the Communist Party USA since 2007. She served several years as labor editor of the People's Weekly World, forerunner to the People's World[10].

Peoples World personnel

As at December 2010, personnel of the Communist Party USA paper, Peoples World, ;[11]

Editorial Board

Bureau Chiefs and National Contibutors, Juan Lopez (N. Calif.), Rossanna Cambron (S. Calif.), Joelle Fishman (Conn.), John Bachtell (Ill.), John Rummel (Mich.), Tony Pecinovsky (Mo.), Dan Margolis (N.Y.), Rick Nagin (Ohio), Libero Della Piana, Scott Marshall, Elena Mora, Emile Schepers, Jarvis Tyner, Sam Webb

Communist Party speaker

Speak Progress is the speakers bureau of the Communist Party USA. Listed speakers, as of October 2014, included Roberta Wood[12]

Roberta Wood has served as Secretary Treasurer of the Communist Party, USA since 2007. A lifelong rank and file union activist, Roberta co-founded the steelworker women’s caucus in the Chicago/Gary district of the Steelworkers union.
In 1976 she was elected the first female member of USWA Local 65’s Executive Board. Following the closing of US Steel’s South Works mill, Roberta worked until retirement as an electrical instrumentation mechanic in a municipal sewage treatment facility.
She served several years as labor editor of the People’s Weekly World, forerunner to the People’s World.

Vietnam delegation

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In April 2016, John Bachtell led David Trujillo, Roberta Wood and Chauncey Robinson, on a Communist Party USA delegation to Vietnam.

They visited the Vietnam Confederation of Labor, and other organizations.

References

  1. Committee to Elect Dr. John R. Lumpkin Press Release, Sept. 10, 1978
  2. http://www.peoplesworld.org/roberta-wood
  3. THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF COMMUNISM IN 1972 (Venceremos Brigade) PART 2, hearings before the Committee on Internal Security 92nd Congress oct 16-19, 1972 pages 8136-8138
  4. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/ed-sadlowski-remembrance-of-a-life-even-bigger-than-the-man/PW NEWS Ed Sadlowski – Remembrance of a life even bigger than the manAugust 7, 2018 10:10 AM CDT BY PAUL KACZOCHA]
  5. Committee to Elect Dr. John R. Lumpkin Press Release, Sept. 10, 1978
  6. People's Weekly World Sep 2 1995 p 14
  7. Peoples Weekly World December 9, 1995 page 19
  8. http://www.pww.org/index.php/article/articleview/882/
  9. We salute the labor movement!, People's World, September 1, 2006
  10. http://www.peoplesworld.org/roberta-wood
  11. Contact the People's World, accessed Dec. 27, 2010
  12. Speak Progress, Speakers page