National Network for Arab American Communities

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National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC) is a Arab advocacy organization that "connects Arab American community-based organizations nationally."[1]

National Network for Arab American Communities is an institution of the Arab American Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS), along with other national Arab advocacy groups Center for Arab American Philanthropy and Arab American National Museum.[2]

Ahmad Abuznaid is the Director of the National Network for Arab American Communities.

Emgage Action rally

Politicians and activists rallied Muslim Americans in Dearborn on July 29 2018 to encourage voter participation in the upcoming Aug. 7 primary election and to register new voters for the November ballot.

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Held outside the Ford Community and Performing Arts Center, there was a festive atmosphere, with bouncy houses for children, and food vendors to tempt tastes, but there was a serious message to impart: In an election pivotal to Muslim Americans candidates and voters, every vote will count, in the primary and general election, and eligible citizens should register and learn about the process and ballot.

The event was organized and sponsored by Emgage Action, an American Muslim community advocacy organization; Mpower Change, a grassroots movement working to build social, spiritual, racial and economic justice for all people; the Michigan Muslim Community Council, which works to unify communities and promote social justice; and the National Network for Arab American Communities, an Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services Institution.

Nada Al-Hanooti, executive director of the Michigan chapter of Emgage Action, said the Muslim community tends to have a low voter turnout.

“What we’re trying to do is energize our community, get them out to the polls, because we have a lot of great candidates right now,” Al-Hanooti said. “Not only because they are Muslim, but because they are extremely qualified and viable candidates. So this is our time, and we are taking full advantage and mobilizing.”

Gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed and political activist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who spoke at the rally, were the reason many attended, but for Majeda Tafish, 40, of Dearborn, who became a naturalized citizen 10 years ago, it was a chance to take the first step to register to vote.

In the past, Tafish said, the lists of candidates and the issues seemed daunting to her.

“I want to vote, to have a voice,” she said. “Wherever I go, they keep saying, ‘Vote, vote,’ but I see a big list and I don’t know any of them. They give me a brochure that says nice things about them, but I don’t know who to believe.”

Among the politicians on hand for the event were Sam Beydoun, candidate for Wayne County Commissioner; Donald Stuckey II, candidate for Michigan’s 9th state House district; state Rep. Sylvia Santana, current House Representative for the 9th district, who is running for state Senator for District 3; Gary Woronchak, Wayne County Commission chairman, who is running for state Senate in the 3rd district; Fatou-Seydi Sarr, candidate for state House in the 8th district; Abraham Aiyash, candidate for the state Senate 2nd district; U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D – 12th District),; Fayrouz Saad, candidate for U.S. House 11th district; Rashida Tlaib, candidate for the U.S. House 13th district; state Rep. Abdullah Hammoud, 15th district; Democratic primary gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed; and Michigan Supreme Court Candidates Samuel Bagenstos and Megan Cavanagh.

Sarr, Aiyash, Dingell, Saad, Tlaib, Hammoud, El-Sayed, Bagenstos and Cavanagh were among the politicians who spoke at the event. They were joined by speakers Dawud Walid, executive director of the Michigan Chapter of the Council of American-Islamic Relations; Ahmad Abuznaid, director of the National Network for Arab American Communities, an Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services institution; activist Khadega Mohammed; activist Linda Sarsour; and political activist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York City.

Abdul El-Sayed called for the Muslim voting community to raise its voices, vote and encourage others to vote in the primary and general election.

“When you look at who we are right now, we are so much better,” he said. “That is the opportunity in front of us on Aug. 7. Let’s not lose that opportunity because we, together, are doing the work of democracy. Now let’s go get it.”[3]

Anniversary of Muslim Ban

06/29/2019 Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib called a press conference today to uplift the one year anniversary of the SCOTUS decision to uphold the hateful Muslim Ban and reflect on its impact in our communities. Rep. Tlaib was joined by Rep. Debbie Dingell, Rep. Brenda Lawrence, and Congressman Andy Levin. Organizations in attendance include National Network for Arab American Communities parent organization ACCESS, ABISA, ACLU of Michigan, Cair - Michigan, Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation, Emgage, and Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion!

National Network for Arab American Communities Executive Director, Ahmad Abuznaid attended in solidarity with the organizations on the ground who are leading the charge to #RepealTheBan.

Since the ban was enacted, families have been torn apart by a reckless policy that fuels anti-Muslim attitudes and action. Our work will continue until all immigrants and refugees are welcomed into this country.[4]

"Communities Against Hate" Leader

National Network for Arab American Communities is listed as a leader of the Open Society Foundation's Communities Against Hate initiative. [5]

"Communities Against Hate is a national initiative to collect data and respond to incidents of violence, threats, and property damage motivated by hate across the United States. The initiative leverages a reporting database (communitiesagainsthate.org) that aggregates reports from victims, witnesses, and news accounts of hate incidents, as well as offers legal resources and social services to support people in need. Communities Against Hate aims to aggregate data on hate incidents, providing legal and social support, raising awareness, and educating the public on the prevalence of hate.
"The initiative is led by the Leadership Conference Education Fund, the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, and partner organizations representing diverse communities that reflect the fabric of America, including: Center for Community Change; Color of Change; Genders & Sexualities Alliance Network (GSA Network); Hollaback!; Muslim Advocates; National Council of La Raza; National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC); New York City Anti-Violence Project; and the Transgender Law Center. The Southern Poverty Law Center is serving as a strategic advisor to the initiative.

Take on Hate

Take on Hate Staff

The Take on Hate initiative lists ACCESS and the National Network for Arab American Communities as "partners".[6]

Advisory Board

The following are listed as the "Advisory Board" for the National Network for Arab American Communities.[7]

Our Team

External Links

References