Maurice Strong Videos

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Maurice Strong



Maurice Strong - Air date: 05-07-01

Maurice Strong - Air date: 05-07-01

haroldchanner — September 16, 2008 — Maurice Strong is a senior advisor to United Nations' Secretary General Kofi Annan. Annan has appointed Strong to lead UN reforms, positioning him to be the next UN Secretary General. But placing Strong in charge of UN reform could pose a significant threat to the American way of life as Strong has used his position to centralize power in the UN at the expense of national sovereignty.

Strong, a native of Canada, grew up during the Great Depression and lived in poverty. He was able to escape poverty and became a successful businessman. During the 1950s and 1960s, Strong was involved in the oil and utility industries and was quite successful. By the time he was 35, Strong was president of a major holding company, the Power Corporation of Canada. As successful as he was, Strong nonetheless felt the need to embellish his achievements. According to National Review, Strong claimed to have had a $200,000 salary when he left the Power Corporation of Canada. But the magazine was informed by an official with the Power Corporation of Canada that Strong's salary was in fact $35,000 upon his departure.

In the early 1970s, UN Secretary General U Thant tapped Strong to organize and direct the Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment. The conference came to be known as the first Earth Summit. In the following year, Strong became the first director of the United Nations Environment Program. These two UN positions marked the beginning of Strong's methodical march toward global governance.

Strong's most significant role at the UN to-date has been his position as Secretary General of the 1992 UN Conference on the Environment and Development, the Rio Earth Summit. In the opening session of the Rio Earth Summit, Strong commented: "The concept of national sovereignty has been an immutable, indeed sacred, principle of international relations. It is a principle which will yield only slowly and reluctantly to the new imperatives of global environmental cooperation. It is simply not feasible for sovereignty to be exercised unilaterally by individual nation states, however powerful. The global community must be assured of environmental security." Interestingly, Strong had initially been blocked from participating in the conference by the US Department of State. When Strong learned of this, however, he persuaded then-President George Bush to overrule the State Department.

Strong is also involved in the United Nations Education Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Through his work in UNESCO, Strong promotes Gaia, the Earth God, among the world's youth. Strong is also the director of The Temple of Understanding in New York. He uses The Temple to encourage Americans concerned about the environment to replace Christianity with the worship of "mother earth."

Strong also directs the UN's Business Council on Sustainable Development. Under his leadership, the council tries to affect peoples' lives through UN policies that attempt to reduce the availability of meat products; limit the use of home and workplace air conditioners; discourage private ownership of motor vehicles; encroach on private property rights; and work to reduce the number of single family homes.

Maurice Strong Interview (BBC, 1972)

Maurice Strong Interview (BBC, 1972)

MDJarv — May 16, 2009 — Today, Maurice Strong sits atop the global environmental movement headed by the United Nations and its interlocking NGO's and tax-exempt foundations.

Strong is considered to be the person behind the globalization of the foundation-funded environmental movement and was the Secretary-General of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment held in 1972, in Stockholm, Sweden.

He co-authored the 'Earth Charter' with Mikhail Gorbachev in 1992. It was Gorbachev who stated in 1996 that the "threat of environmental crisis will be the 'international disaster key' that will unlock the New World Order."

Strong was recruited by David Rockefeller at the age of 17 and groomed for the role he serves today. Despite not having a college education, he was a millionaire by his early 20's and wielded enormous power and influence.

Already in 1972, at the time of this interview, there is talk of doomsday scenarios if people don't give up their rights and drastically alter the way they live. Also mentioned in the interview is zero growth, put forward by the Club of Rome in the late 60's/early 70's, which called for the control of population and economic growth and was the precursor to what we see happening today with the US economy and infrastructure being gutted and sent overseas.

In this interview clip, Strong discusses his proposal of licenses in order for women to give birth, which has been of much talk among the elite for the past several decades. In the 70's, David Rockefeller extended his praise to the communist dictator of China, Mao Zedong, in an article published in the New York Times, for his country's one-child policy, which will be the model for the Western nations to follow in the future -- hence China's "Most Favored Nation" status granted by the UN.

For more information on Strong, see my article titled 'Eco-economic Warfare and the Planned Collapse of Western Civilization':

http://sovereignsentience.blogspot.com/2008/02/recently-when-new-world-orderly-bill_11.html

See also:

Maurice Strong's Unprecedented Rise to Power

Maurice Strong's Unprecedented Rise to Power

MDJarv — July 05, 2009 — From the CBC documentary 'Life and Times' (2004).

This clip takes a look at one of the world's leading figures behind the New World Order agenda, and someone near the very top of the global warming/global tax/one world government swindle. For the past several years, Strong has been living in China following his exposed involvement in the UN's Oil for Food scandal.

While the documentary casts an unabashedly favorable and glowing light on Strong, making him out to be a humanitarian of sorts and someone wanting to make the world a better place through his connections in business and government, those who have done the research and have studied Mr. Strong's background and associations understand that this simply isn't the case. However, this clip does at least highlight the dizzying speed in which Strong rose to power, as well as his many elite associations.

Despite having little education and almost no credentials, Strong has quickly risen through the ranks of power after being vetted by globalist kingpin David Rockefeller in the mid-40s, at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, after Strong landed a job there with the help of people who had connections to the UN.

Strong played a vital role in the rise to power of former Canadian Prime Minister, Paul Martin, landing him his first real job at Power Corporation of Canada. The same goes for James Wolfensohn, former president of the World Bank, who also later hired Strong as an advisor.

- Matthew D. Jarvie

The Big Bad Bank - Greed and Power

The Big Bad Bank - Greed and Power

Maurice Strong - American Water Development Inc. (AWDI)

Strong sought to change Colorado water law so that he could sell it to other cities at a $1 BILLION profit per year.

thebigbadbank — May 04, 2009 — http://www.thebigbadbank.com

"The custodian of the Planet" Maurice Strong is also a big player in the politics of banking. Strong was working to take water from the San Luis Valley in Colorado and sell it at high profit margins to other cities in the US.






Maurice Strong Interviews

From Soldier of Liberty: Maurice Strong – The Interview

ECInternational — November 27, 2009 — Interview with Maurice Strong, former Secretary General of the 1992 Earth Summit and Earth Charter Commissioner, on the upcoming Rio+20 event in 2012. By Mirian Vilela, Earth Charter International. September 2009

Maurice Strong Thoughts on Rio+20 in 2012
Maurice Strong Thoughts on Climate Change
Maurice Strong thoughts on Peace and Sustainability
Maurice Strong on His Motivation in Life

External Links

References