Linda Gordon

From KeyWiki
Jump to: navigation, search


Linda Gordon is a New York City socialist and academic.

Center for the Study of Working Class Life

In 2009 Linda Gordon, History, New York University served as an Academic on the Advisory board for the Center for the Study of Working Class Life[1].

Feminists for Peace and Barack Obama

In early 2008 Linda Gordon, of New York University signed a petition circulated by Feminists for Peace and Barack Obama[2].

In the coming elections, it is important to remember that war and peace are as much \"women\'s issues\" as are health, the environment, and the achievement of educational and occupational equality. Because we believe that all of these concerns are not only fundamental but closely intertwined, this Tuesday we will be casting our vote for Senator Barack Obama as the Democratic nominee for President of the United States.

Open Letter to Obama on Iran

In 2008 Linda Gordon, New York University signed an online petition “A Open Letter to Barack Obama on Iran”.[3]

Democratic Lawyers Council

On April 12, 2010, Anne Hess and Craig Kaplan hosted an event entitled "An Evening for Election Integrity! - With Mark Ritchie, Minnesota's Secretary of State" at 214 East 18th St., New York City. Members of the host committee were: Al Appleton, Caron Atlas, Allison Barlow, Marjorie Fine, Frances Fox Piven, Anne Hess and Craig Kaplan, Allen Hunter and Linda Gordon, Riva Krut and Harris Gleckman, Ruth Katz, Sandra Levinson, Jaykumar Menon, Leah Margulies, Marion Nestle, Anita Nager, Miles Rapoport, Donna Schaper and Warren Goldstein, and Deborah Stern. The event was a fundraiser for Ritchie's upcoming 2010 re-election campaign as Minnesota's Secretary of State.[4]

Writing

  • The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century, Scott Kurashige co-authored with Grace Lee Boggs (University of California Press, 2011); updated and expanded paperback edition with new preface and afterword with Immanuel Wallerstein (University of California Press, 2012).
  • The Shifting Grounds of Race: Black and Japanese Americans in the Making of Multiethnic Los Angeles (Princeton University Press, 2008) in the “Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America” series edited by William Chafe, Gary Gerstle, Linda Gordon, and Julian Zelizer

"A Revolutionary Moment"

A Revolutionary Moment: The Women’s Liberation Movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s was held at Boston University at the end of March 2014. More than 600 people attended.

Hosted by the university’s Women’s and Gender Studies program, the " provided an opportunity to discuss the many issues that face feminists today and to reflect on the work that was done decades ago".

Many of the conference panels focussed on radical and socialist feminism, a part of the history of the women’s movement that has generally been neglected both by scholars and the popular media. Representatives from socialist feminist organizations like the Chicago Womens Liberation Union, Bread and Roses in Boston and the Combahee River Collective discussed the organizing efforts and achievements of their organizations. Many people there had been involved in the New American Movement.

Linda Gordon, professor at New York University and former editor of Radical America, in her closing keynote described the many progressive feminisms, from the 1930s to the present. In the 1930s the Communist Party USA was the only predominantly white group to critique racism and sexism. In the 1960s the women’s movement grew out of the New Left with a shared utopian courage to dream of something completely different. Gordon described women’s liberation as the largest social movement in the history of the U.S. She added that women’s liberation added two perspectives to radical thinking that are important in the current political debate:

  • First, gender is not a characteristic of individual people but is rather the overall system that we live in. Thinking about gender in this way has implications for our overall political analysis.
  • Second, the idea that the personal is political was a key concept for women’s liberation. It implies that power invades all aspects of our lives.

Gordon concluded that women’s liberation is not fundamentally about equality but about transformation. [5]

References