Judy Bryant

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2010 Photo featured in People's World of Judy Bryant (far left) of American Federation of Teachers; Marty Alvarado, campaign manager and sister of Linda Chavez-Thompson, Linda Chavez-Thompson, Barbara Easterling of Texas Alliance for Retired Americans; Gwen Dunivent, President of Dallas AFL-CIO; and Becky Moeller, President of the Texas AFL-CIO.


Judy Bryant is a former teacher, serving as a field organizer for the Texas Alliance for Retired Americans (TARA).

Background

According to her LinkedIn page, Judy Bryant was the "Political Action Vice President" for Alliance-ATF Texas American Federation of Teachers from January 2001 – June 2011. She was a teacher for the Dallas Independent School District from August 1979 – June 2006.[1]

'Tradition of placing signs at polling places' for Marc Veasey

,Texas Alliance for Retired Americans members Judy Bryant, Eddie Morgan, Billy Betts and Hobie Hukill post photo supportive of Marc Veasey

In March 2018, Texas Alliance for Retired Americans posted the following on Facebook:

"Dallas TARA members (l-r) Judy Bryant, Eddie Morgan, Billy Betts and Hobie Hukill continue a tradition of placing signs at polling places for Cong. Marc Veasey, a true friend of working families and retirees. — with Judy Bryant, Eddie Morgan, Billy Betts and Hobie Hukill.

Electoral help

In 2014 Cong. Marc Veasey's campaign asked Texas Alliance for Retired Americans to place his signs at polling places in Oak Cliff and West Dallas.

This is a good way to thank him for his strong support of working families and retirees. If you'd like to join us, please reply to this email or call me.
Judy Bryant, Field Organizer Texas Alliance for Retired Americans.[2]

Featured in People's World

Judy Bryant was featured in the Communist Party USA publication People's World along with "Marty Alvarado, campaign manager and sister of Linda Chavez-Thompson, Linda Chavez-Thompson, Barbara Easterling of Alliance for Retired Americans; Gwen Dunivent, President of Dallas AFL-CIO; and Becky Moeller, President of the Texas AFL-CIO." From the article:[3] The article, written by Jim Lane stressed "Texas would gain four new seats in the U.S. House of Representatives" with more "Latino voters" coming to Texas. The article, written in 2010, claimed that "the population of Texas had increased by 4 million in the past ten years, with 3.2 million of them Spanish-speaking."

"DALLAS – An October 28 rally at the Teachers Hall wrapped up a very successful early voting period. The president of the Alliance for Retired Americans, Barbara Easterling, came from Washington to introduce labor’s own candidate for lieutenant governor, Linda Chavez-Thompson. Texas AFL-CIO President Becky Moeller, Financial Secretary John Patrick, and union leaders from all over north Texas came to honor their candidates and buckle down for the final five election days.
"Easterling brought a letter pledging support to the Chavez-Thompson campaign. She talked about Chavez-Thompson’s tenure as executive vice president of the AFL-CIO and the debt that all American working people owe her. President Moeller congratulated all the unionists on a record-smashing early voting period.
"Estimates of early voter turnout ran as high as 200% over the last mid-term election in 2006. Houston claimed the turnout is as much as 300% higher. Unionists made personal visits to their members every weekend of the campaign and telephone banking occurred at least five nights per week. Every union member in key Dallas County areas received at least one visit and one phone call.
"Chavez-Thompson gave a rousing talk in English, then began over again in Spanish for the television audience. She stressed the growing importance of Latino voters. Dr Elba Garcia, a candidate for county commissioner, also spoke in both languages, as did state representative Roberto Alonzo. Alonzo said that the population of Texas had increased by 4 million in the past ten years, with 3.2 million of them Spanish-speaking.
"The big increase since the last census, Alonzo said, meant that Texas would gain four new seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The party that would take most of those seats would be determined to a large extent by redistricting, which is dominated by the Texas House. Every speaker urged an enthusiastic final effort on election day."

References