Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council

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Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON)



Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON) is a self-proclaimed "coalition of community-based organizations that advocates for the rights and needs of the Asian and Pacific Islander American Community."[1]

Manjusha Kulkarni is Executive Director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council

Stop AAPI Hate

San Francisco State University, the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council in Los Angeles and Chinese for Affirmative Action have launched the Stop AAPI Hate reporting website to track reports of discrimination, including "micro-aggressions".[2]

Members

As of April 16, 2020, the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council had the following "members" listed on their website:[3]

Board Members/Staff

As of April 16, 2020, the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council had the following board and staff members listed on their website:[4]

2016-2018 Board of Directors

2016-2018 Standing Committees Chairs

2013-2014

2012-2013

2011-2012

2010-2011

Joint OpEd

Stop AAPI Hate founders Russell Jeung, chair and professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University, Manjusha Kulkarni, executive director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and Cynthia Choi, co-executive director of Chinese for Affirmative Action wrote a joint op-ed published at the Los Angeles Times titled "Op-Ed: Trump’s racist comments are fueling hate crimes against Asian Americans. Time for state leaders to step in" published on April 1 2020.[5]

'Coronavirus-Related' Hate Crimes and 'Microaggressions' Tracker

In an article titled "Online reporting center launched to track coronavirus-related hate crimes," by Theodora Yu at the Sacremento Bee in March 2020,[6] Manjusha Kulkarni claimed that data collected "will be used for a public education campaign, advocacy work and providing direct assistance."

Verbatim:

In response to rising discrimination toward the Asian community resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, Californian organizations have launched an online response form to collect and track incidents of microaggressions and harassment.
The initiative was jointly established by advocacy organizations Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and the Chinese for Affirmative Action based in Los Angeles and San Francisco.
The form records the date, time and address of the incident, among other details such as contact information of the person who is filing the report. Urgent matters should be reported to the police, according to form instructions.
The form is available in English, traditional and simplified Chinese and Korean so far, and will eventually be available in seven to ten languages, said Manjusha Kulkarni, executive director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council.
According to Kulkarni, community members who are immigrants with limited English proficiency are most comfortable filling the forms in their language of origin.
“We want to make it easy for them, especially seniors, to complete the forms,” she said.
The lack of language resources as well as fears related to the immigration statuses could be factors on why individuals have been hesitant to communicate with law enforcement about the hate crimes they’ve faced, she added.
Kulkarni said that the collected data will be used for a public education campaign, advocacy work and providing direct assistance.
It also allows the organizations to assess the extent and magnitude of these incidents and to develop strategic interventions, said Cynthia Choi, co-executive director of Chinese for Affirmative Action, in a news release.
“We want community members to know they are not alone. They can speak out and help stop the spread of bigotry,” she said.
“This reporting will help us create effective policy solutions for long-lasting change with a deeper impact, so this doesn’t happen again to our communities or any other community,” said Assemblymember David Chiu, D-San Francisco and chair of the California Asian Pacific Islander Legislative Caucus.
Experts and officials denounced President Trump’s labelling of COVID-19 as the “Chinese virus,” which could put Asian Americans at risk of virus-related retaliation.
Dr. Russell Jeung, chair and professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University, saw an increase of racist incidents against Asian Americans following inflammatory comments.
“Clearly, with such political framing, Asians of different ethnicities are being racially profiled as a foreign threat,” Jeung said.
“COVID-19 is a public health issue, not a racial one,” said Assemblymember Phil Ting, D-San Francisco. “Calling it a ‘Chinese virus’ only encourages hate crimes and incidents against Asian Americans at a time when communities should be working together to get through this crisis.”
All information recorded in the online forms will be kept confidential and only shared upon granted permission.

Statement from Executive Director Manjusha Kulkarni

From an interview published at Brown Girl magazine dated May 23, 2019:[7]

I’m now the Executive Director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (AP3CON), where we serve and represent the Asian Pacific Islander community (1.5 million people) in Los Angeles. At AP3CON, we’re often working with people who are becoming a public charge – having to choose between getting food stamps, lunch programs for their kids or legal immigration. We’re also focused on leadership development and want to promote civic engagement especially among South Asians. Our parents spend so much time and energy helping us understand our religion and cultural festivals, but very little time explaining to us that we need to vote or understand our history. All the data in the world shows South Asians are not civically engaged which is to our detriment since we are such a progressive population. I want more South Asians to run for office!”

Partnering Organization of the People's Climate March

According to their website:[8] Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council is a "Partnering Organization" of the People's Climate March as of April 26, 2018.

References