Steve Tobocman

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Steve Tobocman (born January 27, 1970) is a former State Representative from Michigan.

Maurice & Jane Sugar Law Center

In 2007, Steve Tobocman was a member of the Honorary Host Committee for the Essential: Advocacy for Workplace Justice Reception & Silent Auction. The reception, which was held on Nov. 14, 2007 is the annual fundraising event to benefit the far left National Lawyers Guild-affiliated Maurice & Jane Sugar Law Center for Economic & Social Justice. The guest of honor at the reception was Andy Levin, son of Congressman Sander Levin, and Deputy Director at the Michigan Department of Labor & Economic Growth.[1]

In 2008, Steve Tobocman was present at the Essential: Advocacy for Workplace Justice Reception & Silent Auction at Detroit Public Library’s Skillman branch. The reception, which was held on Nov. 14, 2008 is the annual fundraising event to benefit the far left National Lawyers Guild-affiliated Maurice & Jane Sugar Law Center for Economic & Social Justice. The guest of honor at the reception was Andy Levin, son of Congressman Sander Levin, and Deputy Director at the Michigan Department of Labor & Economic Growth.[2]

ACLU meeting

More than 150 people, including several Democratic Socialists of America members , participated in the Metro Detroit ACLU's conference, "Reclaiming Our Rights," January 26th 2008 at the Arab-American National Museum in Dearborn.

Representative John Conyers, Jr., State Senator Gilda Jacobs, State Representative Steve Tobocman, attorney Bill Goodman, and others spoke on the "threats to civil liberties both nationally, under the Bush Administration, and here in Michigan."

ACLU Legal Director Mike Steinberg described several recent civil liberties cases..

"Recent revelations about wiretapping, Internet spying, torture cover-ups, and library censorship show us that the need to protect our rights has never been greater," said Heather Bendure, chair of the ACLU's Metro Detroit branch. [3]

Congressman John Conyers, Jr., Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, updated the conference on the latest efforts by Congress to challenge the Bush Administration’s domestic spying program. Other speakers and panelists included Arab American News Editor Osama Siblani, NAACP Executive Director Heaster Wheeler, and Wayne State University Professor Robert Sedler, ACLU of Michigan attorney Mark Fancher, civil liberties attorney William Swor, and human rights activist Reverend Harry Cook. [4]

Moratorium NOW!

On Sept. 17, 2008, the Moratorium NOW! Coalition to Stop Foreclosures and Evictions sponsored a rally at the Michigan State Capitol, demanding the State Legislature enact SB 1306, a two-year foreclosure moratorium bill. Represented at the rally was UNITE HERE, Change to Win, United Auto Workers, Service Employees International Union, American Federation of Teachers, Green Party of Michigan, Detroit Greens, the Cynthia McKinney presidential campaign, Students for a Democratic Society, National Lawyers Guild, Workers World Party, Food Not Bombs, Critical Moment, Michigan Emergency Committee Against War & Injustice, Michigan Welfare Rights, Call ’Em Out, Latinos Unidos of Michigan, Grand Rapids Latino Community Coalition, Joint Religious Organizing Network for Action and Hope, Adrian Dominican Sisters & Associates for Peace. The following led or spoke at the rally: Sandra Hines and Abayomi Azikiwe of the Moratorium NOW!; Kris Hamel; Reverend Ed Rowe, Central United Methodist Church; State Representatives Gabe Leland, Shanelle Jackson, Bettie Cook Scott and Steve Tobocman; State Sen. Martha G. Scott; Rubie Curl-Pinkins and her daughter Nikki Curl; Jerry Goldberg, people’s attorney and coalition leader; Juan Daniel Castro, Grand Rapids Latino Community Coalition; Linette Crosby; Larry Holmes, a leader of the Troops Out Now Coalition; Robert Pratt of UNITE HERE; and Rosendo Delgado of Latinos Unidos of Michigan.[5]

Moratorium NOW! is affiliated with the Bail Out the People Movement and is controlled by the Workers World Party. The organization's office is located at the Central United Methodist Church and holds meetings there.[6][7]

References