Nancy Skinner

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Nancy Skinner
Nancy Skinner

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Nancy Skinner is a Democrat member of the California State Legislature, representing, the 14th assembly district, which includes Berkeley.

Education

Skinner attended the University of California, Berkeley and earned both a B.S. from the College of Natural Resources and a Masters in Education from the UC Berkeley School of Education.

Student activism

Campus activist in both undergraduate and graduate student governments: was a founder of AGSE - union of graduate student employees, organized UC’s commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Free Speech Movement, key coordinator of campus South Africa Divestment campaign.[1]

DSA member

In 1984, Nancy Skinner was a member of Democratic Socialists of America.[2]

In Berkeley the Citizens Action slate was victorious, giving the Left a seven to one majority on the council, including DSAer Nancy Skinner....

DSA delegate

In November 1985, East Bay DSA delegates to the Democratic Socialists of America National Convention included, Suzanna Tadlock, Eileen Luna, Sandy Chelnov, Fran Biderman, Dean Ferguson, Dave Buchanan, Liv Brown, Matthew Hallinan, Alan Snitov, Ray Ahearn, John Katz, Dale Harrington, Angie Fa, Nancy Skinner.

Environmental activism

As a student at UC Berkeley, Nancy Skinner, was involved in the City of Berkeley's early efforts to increase recycling and promote energy conservation. During the oil crisis of the late 1970s, Skinner and other activists successfully lobbied the City of Berkeley to establish an Energy Office and a citizen’s Energy Commission. As an appointee to the Energy Commission Skinner helped write RECO and CECO, Berkeley’s ordinances that mandate energy efficient retrofits for residential and commercial buildings. Later as a member of Berkeley’s Solid Waste Management Commission Skinner was instrumental in setting the nation’s first 50% recycling goal, passed by Berkeley voters in 1982.

In 1984 Skinner was elected to the Berkeley City Council—becoming the first and only UC Berkeley student to serve on the Council.

During her term Nancy Skinne, was responsible for many of Berkeley's groundbreaking environmental policies, such as Berkeley's environmental economic development strategy and waterfront protection policies that led to the establishment of Eastshore State Park. Skinner’s introduction of Berkeley’s 1988 ban on Styrofoam, the first in the nation, was the spark that led McDonald’s to pull Styrofoam out of all of it’s US outlets.

An early champion of integrating economic development with environmental protection, Skinner initiated the ‘green jobs’ training program at Berkeley’s Youth Employment Services and authored the legislation to establish Berkeley’s Community Energy Services Corporation which continues to provide energy efficiency services to small businesses and homeowners throughout the East Bay.

In 1991 Nancy Skinner joined the team of writers at Earthworks Press that wrote & published best selling book series—including 50 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth. She also worked nationally organizing an Environmental Issues Caucus at the National League of Cities and preventing federal preemption of state and local government action to eliminate ozone depleting compounds in the 1990 renewal of the Clean Air Act.

In 2006 Nancy Skinner, was elected to the Board of the East Bay Regional Park District. With 100,000 acres of parklands and open space East Bay Regional Park District is the largest urban park system in the US. There, Nancy worked to protect open space, add acres of additional parks and expand recreational programs for youth and schools.

  • Introduced Berkeley's Styrofoam ban and 50% recycling goal, making Berkeley the first US city to set these goals;
  • Authored Berkeley’s energy efficient retrofit ordinances that have been implemented by cities across the country and contribute to why Berkeley homes and commercial buildings have among the lowest energy use in the state;
  • Leader in protecting Berkeley's waterfront leading to the establishment of Eastshore Park;
  • Early champion of integrating economic development with environmental protection, initiated Berkeley's 'Green Valley' economic development strategy & established the Community Energy Services Corporation that continues to provide energy efficiency services to homeowners and small businesses throughout the East Bay;
  • Launched Cities for Climate Protection - national movement of over 500 US cities and counties working to stop global warming, led US Mayor's delegation to 1997 Kyoto Protocol;
  • Boardmember of the David Brower Center and Community Conservation Centers, Inc;
  • California Energy Commission appointee to State Climate Change Advisory Committee, member San Francisco Clean Technology Task Force.[3]

ICLEI/Climate change activism

A nationally renowned leader in the fight against global warming, Nancy Skinner founded ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability, an organization dedicated to helping local governments around the world become environmental leaders. As Executive Director of ICLEI’s US office, Nancy Skinner launched the Cities for Climate Protection program —the US movement of Mayors and cities working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that now involves over 500 US cities and counties.

As US Director of The Climate Group, a London based organization, Nancy Skinner worked with Fortune 500 companies, clean tech industries and state and national leaders to pass groundbreaking legislation such as California’s global warming bill AB 32. Nancy organized the July 2006 Climate & Energy Roundtable with Governor Schwarzenegger, Prime Minister Tony Blair, Former Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez & 15 Fortune 500 CEOs, that paved the way for Governor Schwarzenegger's signing of AB 32.

In 2004 Nancy Skinner brought global warming to the attention of the National Association of State Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) and was instrumental in NAIC’s establishment of an Executive Task Force on Insurance and Climate Change. Last year the NAIC Task Force released a white paper on the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Insurance Regulation and is currently undertaking a Climate Risk Disclosure Survey for insurance firms operating in the US.

Nancy Skinner served on the California Energy Commission's Climate Change Advisory Committee and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom's Clean Technology Task Force. Nancy also serves on the board of directors of a number of non-profit organizations including Community Conservation Centers Inc., a recycling buy-back and materials processing center, and the David Brower Center, a project bringing a mix of affordable housing for families with offices for environmental non-profits.[4]

Political career

  • Elected in 1984 citywide, top vote getter & first UC Berkeley student elected to the Berkeley City Council;
  • Re-elected representing District 1 in 1986, 1988 & 1990;
  • Served on Alameda County Training and Employment Board 1985-1991 and Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board 1992-1996;
  • Executive Board National Women's Political Caucus-Alameda North;
  • Elected November 2006 Director, Ward 1 of East Bay Regional Park District (representing Albany, Berkeley, El Cerrito, El Sobrante, Emeryville, Kensington, Richmond, San Pablo); and
  • Elected November 2008 Assemblymember, AD14, representing Albany, Berkeley, El Cerrito, Emeryville, Kensington, Lafayette, Moraga, Orinda, Pleasant Hill, Richmond, and San Pablo and parts of Oakland and El Sobrante.[5]

Political campaigns

Skinner coordinated Loni Hancock's 2002 State Assembly campaign and was a Field Manager for Barbara Lee's 2002 Congressional campaign.

She has worked for the campaigns of several local, state, and national Democratic candidates, including presidential candidates Al Gore and John Kerry.[6]

Nancy Skinner unveils bill to crack down on ammunition sales

In January 2013, Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner unveiled another in a wave of new bills to crack down on guns or ammunition.

Skinner's measure comes in the wake of last month's massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown Conn., where 20 children and six adults were killed before the gunman committed suicide.

The Berkeley Democrat is proposing Assembly Bill 48, which would require sellers of ammunition to be licensed and for purchasers to show identification. All sales would be reported to the Department of Justice.

The Department of Justice would be required under AB 48 to notify local law enforcement of large-quantity purchases over a five-day period by an individual who is not a peace officer. The threshold for notification has not been set.

AB 48 also would ban the manufacture, sale or import of any device that enables a gun to fire more than 10 rounds at one time.[7]

References

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