Kathy Quinn

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Kathy Quinn


Kathleen (Kathy Quinn) is a Philadelphia based socialist activist.

Center for Democratic Values

The Center for Democratic Values, a progressive think-tank developed with Democratic Socialists of America sponsorship, made its first public appearance at the Socialist Scholars Conference in New York, April 12 - 14. 1996 . CDV cosponsored two panels at the conference and held a reception to introduce the Center to the assembled socialist scholars and activists.

The first panel dealt with rethinking the role of government. The discussion centered around a paper authored by DSA member and CDV organizer David Belkin which challenged the left to seriously reopen the issue of the role of government in a democratic society. Carol O'Cleireacain, former New York City Budget Director, another member of the panel, stressed the need for the left to pay more attention to organization and management as well as policy and structure, the traditional focuses of socialist theories. Joseph Schwartz, a DSA member and professor at Temple University, also spoke.

As chair of Philadelphia DSA, Kathy Quinn participated in the second CDV sponsored panel, which was titled "The Next Left". The panel was chaired by DSA National Director Alan Charney. It featured David Sprintzen, head of the Long Island Progressive Coalition, and Quinn focusing on local organizing, and philosophy professors Steven Eric Bronner and Ron Aronson talking in broader and more theoretical terms about the prospects for progressive organizing[1].

Democratic Socialists of America

In 1997, Kathy Quinn was the Philadelphia contact for Democratic Socialists of America.[2]

In 2000 Kathy Quinn was a member of the National Political Committee of Democratic Socialists of America and served on the executive committee of Greater Philadelphia Democratic Socialists of America.[3].

Socialist International

The Democratic Socialists of America, delegation to the XXII Congress of the Socialist International, São Paulo 27-29 October 2003 included[4];

References