John Fuerst

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John Fuerst (born July 15, 1944, at New Rochelle, New York). He was arrested during the Weather Underground Organization "Days of Rage" riots in Chicago during October 1969. Fuerst submerged into the underground in early 1970 and continued to function therein. He has also gone under the names William Allen Friedman, Jeremy Pikser and "Phil".[1]

Foreign Travel

On the evening of September 29, 1968, Fuerst spoke at Luther College, Docorah, Iowa, before a Students for a Democratic Society meeting. He largely devoted his remarks to a description of his trip to Cuba during the summer of 1968. On his arrival in Cuba, Fuerst stated he and fellow travelers were assigned to a Cuban press attache. He indicated that he toured the countryside of Cuba, listened to a speech of Fidel Castro and worked in a factory. Fuerst stated that while in Cuba he stayed in the Hilton Hotel in Havana. He was in Cuba for approximately three weeks. Fuerst advised that he was to return to the U.S. on a Russian freighter, however, the Russians would not let let him and others aboard. Instead, he flew from Havana to Lisbon, Portugal, and later came to the U.S. through New York City, New York. He stated he had not trouble coming through customs at New York even though his passport was stamped Cuba. Fuerst explained how the economy in Cuba worked under the socialism which existed in that country, and how Russia had influenced the country. The country of Cuba was dependent upon Russia, however Cuba wanted to break from Russia as soon as possible. He said that practically everyone in Cuba was in the militia.[1]

Weathermen Flint "War Council"

December 27-31, 1969, about 400 of the national membership of the Weatherman faction of Students for a Democratic Society held a “War Council” at a ballroom dancehall in Flint, Michigan. Posters of a giant cardboard machinegun, Ho Chi Minh, Che Guevera, and Fidel Castro hung everywhere.

Among the attendees of the “War Council in Flint" identified by the Flint police department and/or its informant were: Michael Avey, Karen Ashley, Bill Ayers, Edward Benedict, Margaret Bennett, Douglas Bernhardt, Jeff Blum, Harvey Blume, David Chase, Peter Clapp, Judy Clark, Bernardine Dohrn, Diane Donghi, Linda Evans, Brian Flannigan, David Flatley, John Fuerst, Lynn Ray Garvin, Bert Garskof, Michele Garskof, Mark Glasser, Theodore Gold, Lenny Handlesman, Ann Hathaway, Karen Hardiman, Daniel Hardy, Tom Hayden, Phoebe Hirsch, Arthur Hochberg, Anne Hodges, John Jacobs, Jeff Jones, Sam Karp, David Klafter, Dianne Kohn, Peter Kuttner, Bradford Lang, Stephen Lang, Karen Latimer, Jonathan Lerner, Naomi Lev, Bradford Long, Allan Maki, Eric Mann, Howard Machtinger, Carol McDermott, L.R. Meadows, Lisa Meisel, Jeff Melish, James Mellen, David Millstone, Russell Neufeld, Diana Oughton, John Pilkington, Edward Purtz, Jonah Raskin, Natalie Rosenstein, Dennis Roskamp, Mark Rudd, Karen Selin, Mark Shapiro, Janet Snider, Mike Spiegel, Jane Spiegelman, Marsha Steinberg, David Sole, Susan Stern, Clayton Van Lydegraf, Cathy Wilkerson and Mary Wozniak[2].

WUO Affiliation

Fuerst was sought on a Federal warrant charging violation of Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 1073, Unlawful Flight to Avoid Prosecution, issued in Chicago in connection with his failure to appear in court as a result of his arrest during the Weather Underground Organization Days of Rage" riots.[1]

Illegal Purchase of Dynamite

On May 4, 1970, Fuerst with Roberta Smith's assistance, and using false identification in the name of William Allen Friedman, illegally purchased 50 pounds of dynamite in Tuscotn. This explosive which was apparently purchased for use in some kind of underground bombing was subsequently transported to California. He was sought on a Federal warrant issued in Tuscon, Arizona for this incident.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 FBI Weatherman Underground Summary Dated 8/20/76, Part 2
  2. Senate, Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee to Investigate the Administration of the Internal Security Act and Other Internal Security Laws, The Weather Underground, Committee Print, January 1975, 126-7