Institute for Southern Studies

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Organization logo.
The Institute for Southern Studies is a non-profit media and research center that advocates for progressive political and social causes in the Southern United States.

The slogan on the organization's website banner is, "A New Voice for a Changing South."[1]

According to the organization's website, it provides resources for, "grassroots activists, community leaders, scholars, policy makers and others working to bring lasting social and economic change to the region."[2]

In 1973, the organization began producing a journal, Southern Exposure. In recent years, it began producing an online magazine, Facing South.

Part of the organization's "About" section reads:[2]

The Institute draws attention to the national importance of the South and offers an exciting vision of the region-a place brimming with a capacity for progressive change that challenges its reputation as a monolithic, conservative stronghold.

In 1970, the Institute for Southern Studies was founded by Sue Thrasher, Julian Bond, John Lewis, Peter Bourne, N. Jerold Cohen and Howard Romaine. When the organization was founded, the initial work was done preforming research, holding seminars, and performing activism against the Vietnam War.[3]

Founding Board members

 Institute for Southern Studies Incorporating Documents in North Carolina 

The Institute for Southern Studies was incorporated in the state of North Carolina on July 28, 1989. The founding members listed on the incorporation papers:

Current Board Members

The following members were on the Institute Board of Directors in December 2011:[4]

Project Advisors

The following members served as Project Advisors at the Institute in December 2011:[4]

Former Project Advisors

Staff/personnel

The following members were on staff in December 2011:[6]

Freedom Journalism School

In 2009 the ISS launched a program called the Freedom Journalism School. The goal of this program was to train grassroots journalists to generate "50 media muckrakers".[7] After its launch the program received writeups in several online publications included The Nation[8] and AFL-CIO. While much of the language from ISS was of non-partisan, an AFL-CIO blog implied that the true goal of the program was to create an "army of progressive journalists."[9]

Supporters

The following organizations are listed as supporters on the Institute website.[10]

External links

References