Edith Tiger

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Edith Tiger (June 10, 1919-October 22, 2002) was the director of the National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee from 1968 until it merged into the Center for Constitutional Rights in 1998. She died of a heart attack on Oct. 22, 2002 in Brooklyn at age 83, while eating with her daughter, Martha Potter. She began her work with committee when she worked full time with it in 1956, five years after its founding.[1]

She was born in Poland in 1919, never knowing her Yiddish name, and became Edith Zwick at 3 years old. She married her first husband, David Tiger at 15 years old, but they eventually divorced. She survived her second husband, Charles Roach, by ten months.

The organization was founded by I. F. Stone, the iconoclastic journalist, and five other civil libertarians, as an alternative to the American Civil Liberties Union, which insisted that its officers take an oath that they were not Communists. The new committee was committed to defending those accused of being Communists, and its first cases involved those facing Congressional committees.

The world is getting smaller, she said about the merger with the Center for Constitutional Rights. The old people who gave money are dying, and the younger people don't want to give. Or they don't give to political movements. They give to charities, to what's in the news, like AIDS or abortion. There isn't the politics that there used to be.[1]

Political Rights Defense Fund

As at July 22, 1975, Edith Tiger served on the Advisory Board of the New York based Political Rights Defense Fund.[2]

SANE

In 1978 Edith Tiger served on the Board of Directors of SANE-"A Citizens' Organization for a Sane World".[3]

Rosenberg Fund for Children

In 2003, Edith Tiger was on the Advisory Board of the Rosenberg Fund for Children.[4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Tiger's obituary
  2. Political Rights Defense Fund letter to supporters signed by Syd Stapleton
  3. SANE letterhead May, 1978
  4. Rosenberg Fund for Children Letterhead June 19 2003