Dorian Warren

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Dorian Warren


Dorian T. Warren is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is also a Faculty Affiliate at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies, and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy.

His research and teaching interests include labor organizing & politics, race and ethnic politics, urban politics, American political development, public policy, and social science methodology.

Warren has worked with several national and local organizations including the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, American Rights at Work, UNITE HERE, SEIU, UFCW, Steelworkers, NGLTF Policy Institute, and Jobs with Justice. He currently serves on the boards of the Applied Research Center and the Center for Community Change and is the political editor of The Daily Voice[1].

Crossroads Fund

Ayers, Dohrn, Welbon

In fall of 2005, Crossroads Fund worked closely with donors and board members to put together house parties featuring discussion on critical community issues, and also raise money for Crossroads Fund.

Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, along with Yvonne Welbon and Dorian Warren hosted a group of donors and friends as they "engaged in a lively discussion about political participation in Chicago"[2].

Crossroads Fund is working to understand how to support participation in the electoral process on an on-going basis, making government more accessible and accountable to voters and tax-payers.

Center for Labor Renewal

In 2009 Dorian Warren was listed as an endorser of the Center for Labor Renewal[3].

Center for Community Change board

In 2009 Dorian Warren, Assistant Professor of International & Public Affairs Columbia University New York, NY served on the board of Center for Community Change.[4]

OURWalmart Black Friday protests

In a Nov. 22, 2013 press conference, members of OURWalmart announced that workers throughout the U.S. are planning strikes, walkouts, and demonstrations at 1,500 Walmart locations - up from 1,200 in 2012.

The actions will be "one of the largest mobilizations of working families in American history," organizers said. Protesters will call for Walmart to raise its labor standards, including increasing wages and ceasing to threaten its employees with disciplinary measures when they attempt to organize.

Conference moderator Barbara Gertz, a five-year Walmart worker from Colorado, noted that more than half of the big-box giant's hourly employees make less than $25,000 per year. She remarked, "Why do we, workers at the world's largest company, have to band together just to afford Thanksgiving dinner? Yes, Walmart 'associates' stick together and look out for each other. We have to, because Walmart and the Waltons seem to be fine with the financial struggles we're all facing."

Dorian Warren, an associate professor at Columbia University who spoke at the news conference, added, "We think of Walmart as the embodiment of what's wrong with the American economy. For the typical worker, it represents the death of the American dream and the decline of social mobility. But OURWalmart members are trying to revive the dream. Working families are fighting back like never before, and they have the support of America behind them."

The demonstrations will be another step in the battle against Walmart's anti-worker practices, coming right behind a recent victory for workers, when the National Labor Relations Board decided to charge and fine Walmart for illegal retaliations against its employees who spoke out for better jobs.

Warren continued, "Black Friday 2013 will mark a turning point in American history. 1,500 protests against Walmart is unprecedented."

"Walmart is just a bully," declared Dallas worker Qulima Knacp. "And the only way to fight back against a bully is to speak up. People across the country are starting to see the real Walmart, and that's why I continue to stand up, because the time for change is now."[5]

References