Dick Gregory

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Dick Gregory is a comedian/activist.

GI Civil Liberties Defense Committee

Circa 1969, Dick Gregory , was listed as a sponsor of the Socialist Workers Party led GI Civil Liberties Defense Committee .[1]

National Anti-Imperialist Conference in Solidarity With African Liberation

Dick Gregory of Chicago, Illinois was named as a sponsor of the Communist Party USA dominated National Anti-Imperialist Conference in Solidarity With African Liberation held at Dunbar Vocational High School, Martin Luther King Drive, Chicago, October 19 to 21 1973.[2]

All-Peoples Congress National Advisory Board

In 1983, the Workers World Party influenced All-Peoples Congress' National Advisory Board, included;

DC "home rule" supporter

On Sept. 3, 1997, some 1,000 marchers descended on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., to present their grievances to Congress. Marches in Washington are a regular occurrence, but this one was out of the ordinary in that it consisted almost wholly of D.C. citizens with a demand from the city's neighborhoods: to stop trampling on home rule in the District.

Speakers at the rally—including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Dick Gregory, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Ca) and local activists—decried recent actions by Congress that had robbed the District of the limited measure of home rule it once enjoyed.[4]

Millions More Movement

The Millions More Movement held an important all-day rally Oct. 15, 2005 on the National Mall that attracted an overwhelmingly African-American crowd numbering more than 1 million, according to organizers. The main demand put forth by the rally organizers and supported by the masses there was “Black power!”

Not one U.S. flag was prominent in the crowd, but the colors of the flag for U.S. Black liberation—red, black and green—could be seen everywhere.

This MMM rally was first announced in 2004 as a commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the Million Man March on Oct. 16, 1995, held at the same site. That event attracted at least 1 million, mainly Black men, and was initiated by the Nation of Islam.

The speeches were focused on a variety of issues: the prison system and the plight of political prisoners—especially Mumia Abu-Jamal, Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (formerly H. Rap Brown) and Leonard Peltier-police brutality, reparations, voter disenfranchisement, LGBT oppression, immigrant rights, economic and political empowerment, education and health, the role of art and culture in the struggle for social justice, and much more.

The main presentation at this rally was given by the MMM’s national convener and NOI leader, the Hon. Minister Louis Farrakhan.

Among the many other speakers were Clarence Thomas and Chris Silvera from the Million Worker March Movement; Dr. Dorothy Height of the National Council of Negro Women; Indigenous leaders Russell Means and Vernon Bellecourt; Congress woman Sheila Jackson; Haitian singer Wyclef Jean; Reverends Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson; Viola Plummer of the Dec. 12 Movement; Damu Smith, Black Voices for Peace; and comedian and social activist Dick Gregory.

In a videotaped message played to the crowd, the president of Cuba’s National Assembly, Ricardo Alarcón, expressed the Cuban people’s solidarity with Katrina survivors and all the poor in the U.S. He also spoke about the case of the Cuban 5, who were imprisoned for fighting against terrorism while the U.S. aids and shelters real terrorists like Luis Posada Carriles. [5]

National Congress of Black Women Salutes Sojourner Truth

Dick Gregory:Rep. Bobby Scott, unknown, Julian Epstein

National Congress of Black Women’s Reception to Meet and Greet Honorary Chairs and Truth Commissioners, honoring Sojourner Truth was held at the NW Washington home of Julian Epstein, Wednesday June 6th, 2007.

Attendees included E. Faye Williams (National Congress of Black Women), Barbara Lang (Chamber of Commerce) Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Eleanor Smeal, Kim Gandy, Alice Cohan, Dick Gregory, and Rep. Robert Scott.[6]

SNCC re-union

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee held its 50th anniversary conference at Shaw University here, April 15-18, 2010.

At its founding here on April 17, 1960, the now-legendary civil rights organization adopted its first formal program. Life long Communist Party USA activist Debbie Bell was a founding member, serving alongside Julian Bond, Harry Belafonte, John Lewis (now a member of Congress from Georgia), Freedom Singer and Sweet Honey in the Rock founder Bernice Johnson Reagon, the Revs. David Forbes and James Lawson, Joyce Ladner and Dick Gregory.

All these founders spoke at the anniversary event. There were speeches too by Attorney General Eric Holder and actor Danny Glover.[7]

Glover and Holder were too young to be part of SNCC, but both emphasized that they would not be where they are today without SNCC and its heroic struggle for African American liberation.

Sudan protest

March 16, 2012, Washington, DC: Today at the Sudanese Embassy, 2210 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, TransAfrica Forum President Nicole Lee joined actor and activist George Clooney who just returned from a trip to Sudan and NAACP President Benjamin Jealous, human rights advocate Martin Luther King III and Representative Al Green to demand immediate action to stop Sudan’s use of food as a weapon. All were arrested.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is blocking food and humanitarian aid from reaching half a million people in the Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile regions where they are at grave risk of starvation.

Hundreds of activists are demonstrating at the Sudanese Embassy this morning starting at 10am

Also at the protest were Tom Andrews, President, United to End Genocide, Nick Clooney, Journalist, Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail, Anglican Bishop of Kadugli, South Kordofan, Rabbi Steve Gutow, President, Jewish Council for Public Affairs, Fred Kramer, Executive Director, Jewish World Watch, Congressman Jim McGovern, Congressman James Moran, Dr. E. Faye Williams, national chair of the National Congress of Black Women, Inc., Rabbi David Saperstein, Dick Gregory, and Rep. John Olver.[8][9]

Freedom Summer 50th Anniversary

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) moderated a plenary panel at the Freedom Summer 50th Anniversary Conference at Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi on Saturday, June 28, 2014. The panel, entitled “Our Southern Strategy: Where Do We Go from Here,” focused on the role that the South plays in changing the way that democracy applies to all citizens in the United States. The panel included fellow congressional members: G.K. Butterfield (D-NC), Cedric Richmond (D-LA), and Bennie Thompson (D-MS). Tougaloo College was crucial to the Civil Rights Movement, a safe haven for many activists and a gathering place for the leaders of the Movement. The panel was part of the weeklong Freedom Summer 50th anniversary intergenerational conference. Danny Glover; Julian Bond; Dick Gregory; Sherrilyn Ifill, President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Legal Defense and Educational Fund; and Benjamin Jealous, former President and CEO of the NAACP, were among the participants.[10]

References