David Paterson

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David Paterson


David Paterson is a New York politician. He is the son of Basil Paterson.

Paterson served as the 55th Governor of New York, from 2008 to 2010. Since leaving office, Paterson has been a radio talk show host on station WOR in New York City.

Background

After graduating from Hofstra Law School, Paterson worked in the District Attorney's office of Queens County, New York, and on the staff of Manhattan Borough President David Dinkins. In 1985, he was elected to the New York State Senate to a seat that was once held by his father, former New York Secretary of State Basil Paterson. In 2003, he rose to the position of Senate Minority Leader. Paterson was selected as running mate by then-New York Attorney General and Democratic Party gubernatorial nominee Elliott Spitzer in the 2006 New York gubernatorial election. Spitzer and Paterson were elected in November 2006 with 69 percent of the vote, and Paterson took office as Lieutenant Governor on January 1, 2007.

When Spitzer resigned in the wake of a prostitution scandal, Paterson was sworn in as governor of New York on March 17, 2008. Paterson launched a brief campaign for a full term as Governor in the 2010 gubernatorial election, but announced on February 26, 2010, that he would not be a candidate in the Democratic primary.

Conference on Socialism and Activism

The Maoist-oriented weekly newspaper, The Guardian of November 27, 1985, on Page 14, featured a half-page announcement about the upcoming Conference on Socialism and Activism to be held on December 6-8, 1985, at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City. It was "sponsored" by The Guardian, The Nation Institute, The Progressive (magazine), and WBAI-FM (one of the Pacifica stations).

Keynote Speakers were;

Greeting the Peace Marchers

The Great Peace Marchers arrived in New York, October 23 1986, after trekking 3,500 miles with their message of global nuclear disarmament.

They were greeted at the George Washington Bridge by Mark Green, Democratic candidate for Senate, David Dinkins, Manhattan Borough president, David Livingston, president of District 65 UAW, Assemblymembers David Paterson and Jerrold Nadler, and City Council members Ruth Messinger, Miriam Friedlander, Carolyn Maloney and Stanley Michaels.

The following Friday, the Communist Party USA's People's Daily World sponsored a reception for 25 of the marchers at Unity Auditorium on West 23rd St.[1]

Tabankin soiree

In February 1995, a private party was held in New York to celebrate Margery Tabankin who had been recently chosen to head Steven Spielberg's Righteous Person's Foundation, (Tabankin also ran the Streisand Foundation). Attendees included Jesse Jackson, Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman, Streisand publicist Ken Sunshine, Rev. Al Sharpton, Ruth Messinger, Charles Schumer, Mark Green, Basil Paterson, David Paterson, David Dinkins, New York Urban League President Dennis Walcott, and Warner Records chairman Danny Goldberg. The talk focused on how "liberals could take the political spotlight back from the conservatives"[2]

Paul Robeson celebration

On May 31 1998 the Peoples Weekly World held a Paul Robeson birth centennial celebration in New York, at the Henry Winston Auditorium.

Attendees included;

Tributes came from ;

  • Tom Duane authored a City Council proclamation praising Robeson's lifelong fight for a "world at peace, free of racism, inequality and for unity"...and his fight against the erosion of domestic freedom of expression and fanatical anti-communism....Paul Robeson has become a model and an inspiration to all of us..."
  • Richard Gottfried, presented a resolution from the New York State assembly honoring Robeson. Democrat David Paterson introduced the resolution in the State Senate. Republican John Marchi and Democrats Richard Gottfried and Roger Green, introduced it in the State Assembly.[3]

"Progressive Democrat"

Communist Party USA members Elena Mora and Gabe Falsetta wrote a report for the People's World, of November 19 2004 "Many positives in N.Y. elections," commenting on the gains made by "progressive" candidates.[4]

The big gains were at the state level. State Senate seats were won by some progressive Democrats:
Tom Duane, David Paterson, Eric Schneiderman, and Liz Kruger, all of Manhattan, all retained their Senate seats. Brian McLaughlin, president of the New York City Central Labor Council, won a seat in the Assembly.

Percy Sutton protege

In a statement, December 2009, Gov. David Paterson called the late Percy Sutton a mentor and “one of New York’s and this nation’s most influential African-American leaders.”

“Percy was fiercely loyal, compassionate and a truly kind soul,” Paterson continued. “He will be missed but his legacy lives on through the next generations of African-Americans he inspired to pursue and fulfill their own dreams and ambitions.” [5]

Dream of Equality awardee

David Paterson is a past recipient of Asian Americans for Equality's annual Dream of Equality award.[6]

References

  1. PDW Oct. 23. 1986, page 3, 'Full schedule in NYC for peace marchers' by Richard Hoyen
  2. [Barbra and Jesse split an egg roll. New York Magazine 20 Feb 1995 page 13]
  3. PWW Hundreds honor Robeson's communist legacy, June 6, 1998, page 3
  4. PW, Many positives in N.Y. elections, by: Elena Mora and Gabe Falsetta November 19 2004
  5. NewsOne, Percy Sutton, Lawyer For Malcolm X, Dies At 89 Dec 27, 2009
  6. [AAFE 2013 Banquet Journal, by Douglas Lim at Mar 26, 2013]